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Evolutionary macroeconomics: a research agenda

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  • John Foster

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  • John Foster, 2011. "Evolutionary macroeconomics: a research agenda," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 5-28, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:21:y:2011:i:1:p:5-28 DOI: 10.1007/s00191-010-0187-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas Brenner & Claudia Werker, 2004. "Empirical Calibration of Simulation Models," Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 89, Society for Computational Economics.
    2. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2004. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-165, June.
    3. Mokyr, Joel, 2005. "Long-Term Economic Growth and the History of Technology," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 17, pages 1113-1180 Elsevier.
    4. J. Stan Metcalfe & John Foster & Ronnie Ramlogan, 2006. "Adaptive economic growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 7-32.
    5. Durlauf, Steven N. & Johnson, Paul A. & Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2005. "Growth Econometrics," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 555-677 Elsevier.
    6. StevenN. Durlauf & Andros Kourtellos & ChihMing Tan, 2008. "Are Any Growth Theories Robust?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(527), pages 329-346, March.
    7. Ayres, Robert U. & Warr, Benjamin, 2005. "Accounting for growth: the role of physical work," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 181-209, June.
    8. Francois, P. & Lloyd-Ellis, H., 2001. "Animal Spirits Meets Creative Destruction," Discussion Paper 2001-36, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    9. Kurt Dopfer & John Foster & Jason Potts, 2004. "Micro-meso-macro," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 263-279.
    10. John Foster, 2000. "Competitive selection, self-organisation and Joseph A. Schumpeter," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 311-328.
    11. Uwe Cantner & Jean-Luc Gaffard & Lionel Nesta, 2008. "Schumpeterian perspectives on innovation, competition and growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 291-293.
    12. Bart Verspagen, . "Evolutionary macroeconomics: A synthesis between neo-Schumpeterian and post-Keynesian lines of thought," The Electronic Journal of Evolutionary Modeling and Economic Dynamics, IFReDE - Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    13. Giovanni Dosi & Giorgio Fagiolo & Andrea Roventini, 2006. "An Evolutionary Model of Endogenous Business Cycles," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 3-34, February.
    14. Alain Alcouffe & Thomas Kuhn, 2004. "Schumpeterian endogenous growth theory and evolutionary economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 223-236.
    15. John Foster & Phillip Wild, 1999. "Detecting self-organisational change in economic processes exhibiting logistic growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 109-133.
    16. Franco Malerba & Richard Nelson & Luigi Orsenigo & Sidney G. Winter, 2001. "History-Friendly Models: an Overview of the Case of the Computer Industry," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 4(3), pages 1-6.
    17. Iyigun, Murat, 2006. "Clusters of invention, life cycle of technologies and endogenous growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 687-719, April.
    18. Ulrich Witt & Thomas Brenner, 2007. "Output Dynamics, Flow Equilibria and Structural Change – A Prolegomenon to Evolutionary Macroeconomics," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2007-12, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    19. Alain Alcouffe & Thomas Kuhn, 2004. "Schumpeterian endogenous growth theory and evolutionary economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 223-236.
    20. Pier Saviotti & Andreas Pyka, 2008. "Product variety, competition and economic growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 323-347.
    21. G. Silverberg & B. Verspagen, 1995. "Evolutionary Theorizing on Economic Growth," Working Papers wp95078, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
    22. Acemoglu, Daron & Johnson, Simon & Robinson, James A., 2005. "Institutions as a Fundamental Cause of Long-Run Growth," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 6, pages 385-472 Elsevier.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Foster, 2015. "The Australian Multi-Factor Productivity Growth Illusion," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, pages 33-42.
    2. Rengs, Bernhard & Scholz-Waeckerle, Manuel, 2017. "Consumption & Class in Evolutionary Macroeconomics," MPRA Paper 80021, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Zakaria Babutsidze & Maurizio Iacopetta, 2016. "Innovation, growth and financial markets," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 1-24, March.
    4. Stefanović Zoran, 2014. "Evolution Of “Rules Of The Game”, Macroeconomic Dynamics And Reform Policy," Economic Themes, De Gruyter Open, pages 480-497.
    5. repec:spr:joevec:v:27:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00191-017-0525-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Byrnes, Liam & Brown, Colin & Foster, John & Wagner, Liam D., 2013. "Australian renewable energy policy: Barriers and challenges," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, pages 711-721.
    7. Brendan Markey-Towler, 2016. "Law of the jungle: firm survival and price dynamics in evolutionary markets," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 655-696.
    8. Heike Schroeder, 2011. "Application possibilities of the micro-meso-macro framework in economic geography," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1115, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Aug 2011.
    9. John Foster, 2016. "The Australian growth miracle: an evolutionary macroeconomic explanation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(3), pages 871-894.
    10. John Foster, 2014. "Energy, knowledge and economic growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 209-238.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Complex system; Dissipative structure; Economic evolution; Economic growth; Energy; Knowledge; Macroeconomics; Micro-meso-macro; Economic methodology; Agent-based modelling; B22; B25; B41; B52; C51; C52; C63; E02; E11; Q43;

    JEL classification:

    • B22 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Macroeconomics
    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • E02 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Institutions and the Macroeconomy
    • E11 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Marxian; Sraffian; Kaleckian
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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