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A multivariate unobserved component analysis of US housing market

Author

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  • Mohamadou Fadiga

    ()

  • Yongsheng Wang

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Mohamadou Fadiga & Yongsheng Wang, 2009. "A multivariate unobserved component analysis of US housing market," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 33(1), pages 13-26, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jecfin:v:33:y:2009:i:1:p:13-26
    DOI: 10.1007/s12197-008-9027-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lo, Andrew W & Wang, Jiang, 1995. " Implementing Option Pricing Models When Asset Returns Are Predictable," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(1), pages 87-129, March.
    2. Edward E. Leamer, 2007. "Housing is the business cycle," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 149-233.
    3. Fadiga, Mohamadou L. & Misra, Sukant K., 2007. "Common Trends, Common Cycles, and Price Relationships in the International Fiber Market," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(01), April.
    4. Gerald Carlino & Keith Sill, 2001. "Regional Income Fluctuations: Common Trends And Common Cycles," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(3), pages 446-456, August.
    5. Andrew Harvey & Esther Ruiz & Neil Shephard, 1994. "Multivariate Stochastic Variance Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(2), pages 247-264.
    6. Norman Miller & Liang Peng, 2006. "Exploring Metropolitan Housing Price Volatility," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 5-18, August.
    7. G. Donald Jud & Dan T. Winkler, 2002. "The Dynamics of Metropolitan Housing Prices," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 23(1/2), pages 29-46.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. William Miles, 2015. "Regional House Price Segmentation and Convergence in the US: A New Approach," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 113-128, January.
    2. MeiChi Huang & LinYing Yeh, 2015. "Should the Fed take extra action for the recent housing bubble? Evidence from asymmetric transitory shocks," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(4), pages 762-781, October.
    3. Rolando Peláez, 2012. "The housing bubble in real-time: the end of innocence," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 36(1), pages 211-225, January.
    4. Ferrara, L. & Koopman, S J., 2010. "Common business and housing market cycles in the Euro area from a multivariate decomposition," Working papers 275, Banque de France.
    5. Kim, Young Se & Rous, Jeffrey J., 2012. "House price convergence: Evidence from US state and metropolitan area panels," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 169-186.
    6. repec:bla:intfin:v:20:y:2017:i:1:p:64-91 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Wei Kang & David Penn & Joachim Zietz, 2015. "The response of state employment to oil price volatility," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(3), pages 478-500, July.
    8. Ryan Greenaway-McGrevy & Arthur Grimes & Mark Holmes, 2016. "Two countries, sixteen cities, five thousand kilometres: How many housing markets?," ERSA conference papers ersa16p49, European Regional Science Association.
    9. Huang, MeiChi & Chiang, Hsiu-Hsuan, 2017. "An early alarm system for housing bubbles," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 34-49.
    10. Yunus, Nafeesa, 2015. "Trends and convergence in global housing markets," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 100-112.
    11. MeiChi Huang & Tzu-Chien Wang, 2015. "Housing-bubble vulnerability and diversification opportunities during housing boom–bust cycles: evidence from decomposition of asset price returns," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(2), pages 605-637, March.
    12. MeiChi Huang, 2014. "Monetary policy implications of housing shift-contagion across regional markets," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 38(4), pages 589-608, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Common Factors; Housing Prices; Kalman Filter; Unobserved Components; State-space; E30; G0; R31;

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G0 - Financial Economics - - General
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

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