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From data to levy design. The five stages of implementing housing taxes

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    Taxes on housing consumption have attractive features. They can enhance overall efficiency, function as automatic stabilizers, and work progressively. Implementation, however, requires a careful balance between economic ambition and political reality. This article suggests a 5-stage procedure: identification; estimation; data acquisition and combination; empirical investigation; and tax function construction. It illustrates how to implement by employing the rental-equivalence principle to estimate recent values of owner-occupied housing consumption in a cross-section of Norwegian households by imputing rent for owners based on observed rents in rental markets. It analyzes the distribution of imputed rent over the income range, and demonstrates that imputed rent is a necessary good. A simple tax scheme on real households in a dataset from 2006, shows how a housing tax can be structured with attractive features. Such a tax scheme would, in contrast to the current interest payment subsidy, work counter-cyclically and could, if used as a substitute for income taxes, reduce deadweight losses from labor income taxes. In its suggested form, it would generate approximately 12 billion NOK in revenue for Norway.

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    File URL: http://www.ssb.no/a/publikasjoner/pdf/DP/dp596.pdf
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    Paper provided by Research Department of Statistics Norway in its series Discussion Papers with number 596.

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    Date of creation: Oct 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:596
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    1. Charles Ka-Yui Leung, 2004. "Macroeconomics and Housing: A Review of the Literature," Departmental Working Papers _164, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics.
    2. Martin Gervais, 1998. "Housing Taxation and Capital Accumulation," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 9807, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
    3. James M. Poterba, 1992. "Taxation and Housing: Old Questions, New Answers," NBER Working Papers 3963, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Morris A. Davis & Jonathan Heathcote, 2005. "Housing And The Business Cycle," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(3), pages 751-784, 08.
    5. Aaron, Henry, 1970. "Income Taxes and Housing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(5), pages 789-806, December.
    6. Philippe Thalmann, 2007. "Tenure-neutral and Equitable Housing Taxation," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 44(2), pages 275-296, February.
    7. Arthur Lewbel, 1998. "Semiparametric Latent Variable Model Estimation with Endogenous or Mismeasured Regressors," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(1), pages 105-122, January.
    8. Cremer, Helmuth & Gahvari, Firouz, 1998. "On Optimal Taxation of Housing," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 315-335, May.
    9. Joel Slemrod & Wojciech Kopczuk, 2000. "The Optimal Elasticity of Taxable Income," NBER Working Papers 7922, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Edward E. Leamer, 2007. "Housing is the business cycle," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 149-233.
    11. Patric H. Hendershott & Michael White, 2000. "Taxing and Subsidizing Housing Investment: The Rise and Fall of Housing's Favored Status," NBER Working Papers 7928, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Christiansen, Vidar, 1984. "Which commodity taxes should supplement the income tax?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 195-220, July.
    13. G. Donald Jud & Dan T. Winkler, 2002. "The Dynamics of Metropolitan Housing Prices," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 23(1/2), pages 29-46.
    14. Bye, Brita & Avitsland, Turid, 2003. "The welfare effects of housing taxation in a distorted economy: a general equilibrium analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 895-921, September.
    15. Nakagami, Yasuhiro & Pereira, Alfredo M., 1996. "Budgetary and Efficiency Effects of Housing Taxation in the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 68-86, January.
    16. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Arthur Lewbel, 1997. "Quadratic Engel Curves And Consumer Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 527-539, November.
    17. Atkinson, A. B. & Stiglitz, J. E., 1976. "The design of tax structure: Direct versus indirect taxation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1-2), pages 55-75.
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