IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/mtu/wpaper/10_07.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

New Zealand Housing Markets: Just a Bit-Player in the A-League?

Author

Listed:
  • Arthur Grimes

    () (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research, University of Waikato)

  • Mark Holmes

    () (University of Waikato)

Abstract

House price trends in each of New Zealand and Australia are frequently discussed as national level developments. Sub-national developments are also important, especially where regions display idiosyncratic trends driven either by demand factors (differential income patterns) or by supply factors (geographical or regulatory restrictions). At a broader scale, it is possible that the New Zealand housing market, or a specific regional housing market (e.g. Auckland), is part of a broader Australasian housing market. If this were the case, New Zealand house prices would converge to a broadly stable ratio of house prices in Australia. One reason this could occur is if international macroeconomic and asset price trends dominate housing market outcomes. New Zealand authorities may then be relatively powerless to control the major real determinants of house prices through regulatory or other policies. We extract the major drivers of house prices at regional levels within New Zealand and Australia to examine the degree of differentiation across regional housing markets. While some minor regional differences are apparent, the evidence points to the dominance of a single trans-Tasman housing trend.

Suggested Citation

  • Arthur Grimes & Mark Holmes, 2010. "New Zealand Housing Markets: Just a Bit-Player in the A-League?," Working Papers 10_07, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:10_07
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://motu-www.motu.org.nz/wpapers/10_07.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Deirdre N. McCloskey & Stephen T. Ziliak, 1996. "The Standard Error of Regressions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 97-114, March.
    2. Arthur Grimes & Yun Liang, 2007. "Spatial Determinants of Land Prices in Auckland:Does the Metropolitan Urban Limit Have an Effect?," Working Papers 07_09, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    3. Arthur Grimes & Andrew Aitken, 2004. "What's the Beef with House Prices? Economic Shocks and Local Housing Markets," Working Papers 04_08, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    4. Mark J. Holmes & Arthur Grimes, 2005. "Is there long-run convergence of regional house prices in the UK?," Working Papers 05_11, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    5. Arthur Grimes & Andrew Aitken, 2010. "Housing Supply, Land Costs and Price Adjustment," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 38(2), pages 325-353.
    6. Steven Clark & T. Coggin, 2009. "Trends, Cycles and Convergence in U.S. Regional House Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 264-283, October.
    7. Craig A. Gallet, 2004. "Housing market segmentation: An application of convergence tests to Los Angeles region housing," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 38(3), pages 551-561, September.
    8. James Hansen, 2009. "Australian House Prices: A Comparison of Hedonic and Repeat-Sales Measures," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 85(269), pages 132-145, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Allan, Corey & Kerr, Suzi, 2013. "Examining Patterns in and Drivers of Rural Land Values," 2013 Conference, August 28-30, 2013, Christchurch, New Zealand 160191, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    2. Ryan Greenaway-McGrevy & Arthur Grimes & Mark Holmes, 2016. "Two countries, sixteen cities, five thousand kilometres: How many housing markets?," ERSA conference papers ersa16p49, European Regional Science Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    House price convergence; international housing markets; Australasia;

    JEL classification:

    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:10_07. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Maxine Watene). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/motuenz.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.