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Failing to notice? Uneven teachers’ attention to boys and girls in the classroom

Author

Listed:
  • Marina Bassi

    () (World Bank Group)

  • Mercedes Mateo Díaz

    () (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • Rae Lesser Blumberg

    () (University of Virginia)

  • Ana Reynoso

    () (University of Michigan)

Abstract

This paper analyzes whether teachers’ attention to boys and girls differs in low-performing schools in Chile, where large gender gaps in test scores are also observed. We coded 237 videotaped classes of fourth graders, identifying specific behaviors of teachers toward boys and girls. The results show a general imbalance in teachers’ attention and interactions favoring boys. Gender attention gap is correlated with lower scores in math for girls on Chile’s national standardized test (SIMCE). The gender attention gap was also greater in general in classrooms in which teachers had overall worse interactions with students, as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS). The evidence in this paper contributes to the discussion about whether traditional measures of teacher–student interactions really capture all that matters for learning. JEL Classification O12, J16, I2

Suggested Citation

  • Marina Bassi & Mercedes Mateo Díaz & Rae Lesser Blumberg & Ana Reynoso, 2018. "Failing to notice? Uneven teachers’ attention to boys and girls in the classroom," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-22, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izalbr:v:7:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1186_s40172-018-0069-4
    DOI: 10.1186/s40172-018-0069-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Steven G. Rivkin & Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain, 2005. "Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 417-458, March.
    2. Hugo Ñopo, 2012. "New Century, Old Disparities : Gender and Ethnic Earnings Gaps in Latin America and the Caribbean," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11953, November.
    3. Marianne Bertrand & Jessica Pan, 2013. "The Trouble with Boys: Social Influences and the Gender Gap in Disruptive Behavior," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 32-64, January.
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    5. Prashant Bharadwaj & Giacomo De Giorgi & David Hansen & Christopher Neilson, 2015. "The gender gap in mathematics: evidence from a middle-income country," Staff Reports 721, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    6. repec:idb:brikps:78540 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Marina Bassi & Costas Meghir & Ana Reynoso, 2016. "Education Quality and Teaching Practices," NBER Working Papers 22719, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. David Autor & David Figlio & Krzysztof Karbownik & Jeffrey Roth & Melanie Wasserman, 2019. "Family Disadvantage and the Gender Gap in Behavioral and Educational Outcomes," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 338-381, July.
    9. Hugo Ñopo, 2012. "New Century, Old Disparities : Gender and Ethnic Earnings Gaps in Latin America and the Caribbean," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11953, September.
    10. Murnane, Richard J & Willett, John B & Levy, Frank, 1995. "The Growing Importance of Cognitive Skills in Wage Determination," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 251-266, May.
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    13. Marina Bassi & Matias Busso & Juan Sebastian Muñoz, 2015. "Enrollment, Graduation, and Dropout Rates in Latin America: Is the Glass Half Empty or Half Full?," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2015), pages 113-156, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marina Bassi & Costas Meghir & Ana Reynoso, 2016. "Education Quality and Teaching Practices," NBER Working Papers 22719, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Rakshit, Sonali & Sahoo, Soham, 2020. "Biased Teachers and Gender Gap in Learning Outcomes: Evidence from India," GLO Discussion Paper Series 684, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender gap; Quality of teacher–student interactions; Student learning;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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