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Ageing and health care expenditure in EU-15

Author

Listed:
  • Mickael Bech

    ()

  • Terkel Christiansen
  • Ehsan Khoman
  • Jørgen Lauridsen
  • Martin Weale

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Mickael Bech & Terkel Christiansen & Ehsan Khoman & Jørgen Lauridsen & Martin Weale, 2011. "Ageing and health care expenditure in EU-15," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 12(5), pages 469-478, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:12:y:2011:i:5:p:469-478
    DOI: 10.1007/s10198-010-0260-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
    2. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    3. Getzen, Thomas E., 2000. "Health care is an individual necessity and a national luxury: applying multilevel decision models to the analysis of health care expenditures," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 259-270, March.
    4. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Jonsson, Bengt, 2000. "International comparisons of health expenditure: Theory, data and econometric analysis," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 11-53 Elsevier.
    5. Seshamani, Meena & Gray, Alastair M., 2004. "A longitudinal study of the effects of age and time to death on hospital costs," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 217-235, March.
    6. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    7. Joaquim Oliveira Martins & Frédéric Gonand & Pablo Antolín & Christine de la Maisonneuve & Kwang-Yeol Yoo, 2005. "The Impact of Ageing on Demand, Factor Markets and Growth," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 420, OECD Publishing.
    8. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:joecag:v:8:y:2016:i:c:p:42-51 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. van Baal, Pieter H. & Wong, Albert, 2012. "Time to death and the forecasting of macro-level health care expenditures: Some further considerations," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 876-887.
    3. Brian K. Chen & Hawre Jalal & Hideki Hashimoto & Sze-Chuan Suen & Karen Eggleston & Michael Hurley & Lena Schoemaker & Jay Bhattacharya, 2016. "Forecasting Trends in Disability in a Super-Aging Society: Adapting the Future Elderly Model to Japan," NBER Working Papers 21870, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Böhm, Sebastian & Grossmann, Volker & Strulik, Holger, 2017. "R&D-driven medical progess, health care costs, and the future of human longevity," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 325, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    5. Diogo Ferreira & Rui Marques, 2015. "Did the corporatization of Portuguese hospitals significantly change their productivity?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(3), pages 289-303, April.
    6. Huarng, Kun-Huang & Yu, Tiffany Hui-Kuang, 2015. "Healthcare expenditure with causal recipes," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 1570-1573.
    7. Colombier, Carsten, 2016. "Population aging in healthcare - a minor issue? Evidence from Switzerland," FiFo Discussion Papers - Finanzwissenschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 16-3, University of Cologne, FiFo Institute for Public Economics.
    8. Yu, Tiffany Hui-Kuang & Wang, David Han-Min & Wu, Kuo-Lun, 2015. "Reexamining the red herring effect on healthcare expenditures," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(4), pages 783-787.
    9. Sónia Morgado, 2014. "Does health promote economic growth? Portuguese case study: from dictatorship to full democracy," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(6), pages 591-598, July.
    10. Friedrich Breyer & Normann Lorenz & Thomas Niebel, 2015. "Health care expenditures and longevity: is there a Eubie Blake effect?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(1), pages 95-112, January.
    11. Karlsson, Martin & Klohn, Florian, 2011. "Some notes on how to catch a red herring - Ageing, time-to-death and care costs for older people in Sweden," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2011:6, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
    12. Wren, Maev-Ann & Connolly, Sheelagh & Cunningham, Nathan, 2015. "An Examination of the Potential Costs of Universal Health Insurance in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS45.
    13. Böhm, Sebastian & Grossmann, Volker & Strulik, Holger, 2017. "The Future of Human Health, Longevity, and Health Costs," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168288, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    14. repec:eee:hepoli:v:121:y:2017:i:7:p:764-769 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Martin Karlsson & Florian Klohn, 2014. "Testing the red herring hypothesis on an aggregated level: ageing, time-to-death and care costs for older people in Sweden," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(5), pages 533-551, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health care expenditure; Ageing; EU-15 countries; H2; H51; I1; J14;

    JEL classification:

    • H2 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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