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Climate change, adaptation and economic growth

  • Alex Bowen
  • Sarah Cochrane
  • Samuel Fankhauser

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10584-011-0346-8
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Climatic Change.

    Volume (Year): 113 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 (July)
    Pages: 95-106

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:113:y:2012:i:2:p:95-106
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

    Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/10584

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    1. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    2. Noy, Ilan, 2009. "The macroeconomic consequences of disasters," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 221-231, March.
    3. Hausmann, Ricardo, 2006. "Economic Growth: Shared Beliefs, Shared Disappointments?," Working Paper Series rwp06-030, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    4. Richard Hornbeck, 2012. "The Enduring Impact of the American Dust Bowl: Short- and Long-Run Adjustments to Environmental Catastrophe," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(4), pages 1477-1507, June.
    5. Martin Gassebner & Alexander Keck & Robert Teh, 2010. "Shaken, Not Stirred: The Impact of Disasters on International Trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(2), pages 351-368, 05.
    6. L Alan Winters, 2004. "Trade Liberalisation and Economic Performance: An Overview," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages F4-F21, 02.
    7. Toya, Hideki & Skidmore, Mark, 2007. "Economic development and the impacts of natural disasters," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 20-25, January.
    8. John Landon-Lane & Hugh Rockoff & Richard H. Steckel, 2011. "Droughts, Floods and Financial Distress in the United States," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present, pages 73-98 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Eboli, Fabio & Parrado, Ramiro & Roson, Roberto, 2010. "Climate-change feedback on economic growth: explorations with a dynamic general equilibrium model," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(05), pages 515-533, October.
    10. Margaret S. McMillan & Dani Rodrik, 2011. "Globalization, Structural Change and Productivity Growth," NBER Working Papers 17143, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Susmita Dasgupta & Benoit Laplante & David Wheeler & Brian Blankespoor, 2010. "The Economics of Adaptation to Extreme Weather Events in Developing Countries," Working Papers id:2509, eSocialSciences.
    12. Samuel Fankhauser & Richard S.J. Tol, 2001. "On Climate Change And Economic Growth," Working Papers FNU-10, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jun 2002.
    13. Stéphane Hallegatte & Jean Charles Hourcade & Patrice Dumas, 2007. "Why economic dynamics matter in assessing climate change damages : illustration on extreme events," Post-Print hal-00164626, HAL.
    14. Francesco Bosello & Roberto Roson & Richard S.J. Tol, 2004. "Economy-Wide Estimates Of The Implications Of Climate Change: Sea Level Rise," Working Papers FNU-38, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jan 2004.
    15. Stéphane Hallegatte & Michael Ghil, 2008. "Natural disasters impacting a macroeconomic model with endogenous dynamics," Post-Print hal-00716677, HAL.
    16. Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2003. "Institutions Don't Rule: Direct Effects of Geography on Per Capita Income," NBER Working Papers 9490, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Schelling, Thomas C, 1992. "Some Economics of Global Warming," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 1-14, March.
    18. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2002. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 9305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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