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Ethnic Sorting in The Netherlands

  • Aslan Zorlu

    (Department of Human Geography, Planning and Development Studies, AMIDSt, Nieuwe Prinsengracht 130, Amsterdam, 1018 VZ, The Netherlands, a.zorlu@uva.nl)

  • Jan Latten

    (Statistics Netherlands, The Hague, The Netherlands, JLTN@cbs.nl)

This paper examines the residential mobility behaviour of immigrants and natives in The Netherlands using a rich administrative individual data file. The inclination to move and the choice of destination neighbourhood are estimated, correcting for the selection bias of movers. Subsequently, the role of preferences and discrimination in the mobility behaviour is implicitly derived from regression estimates. The analysis shows that the percentage of natives in the destination neighbourhood is predicted to be about 18 percentage points lower for non-Western immigrants than for natives. About 65 per cent of the differential is explained by their observable characteristics; the remaining part can largely be attributed to preferences and discrimination. No indication is found of the spatial assimilation of second-generation non-Western immigrants. On the other hand, the mobility pattern of the second-generation Western immigrants is similar to that of natives.

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File URL: http://usj.sagepub.com/content/46/9/1899.abstract
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Article provided by Urban Studies Journal Limited in its journal Urban Studies.

Volume (Year): 46 (2009)
Issue (Month): 9 (August)
Pages: 1899-1923

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Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:46:y:2009:i:9:p:1899-1923
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.gla.ac.uk/departments/urbanstudiesjournal

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  1. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 1997. "The Rise and Decline of the American Ghetto," NBER Working Papers 5881, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  3. Shoshana Neuman & Ronald Oaxaca, 2004. "Wage Decompositions with Selectivity-Corrected Wage Equations: A Methodological Note," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 3-10, April.
  4. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  5. W. Clark, 1991. "Residential preferences and neighborhood racial segregation: A test of the schelling segregation model," Demography, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 1-19, February.
  6. Cotton, Jeremiah, 1988. "On the Decomposition of Wage Differentials," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(2), pages 236-43, May.
  7. Spilimbergo, Antonio & Ubeda, Luis, 2004. "Family attachment and the decision to move by race," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 478-497, May.
  8. Oaxaca, Ronald L. & Ransom, Michael R., 1994. "On discrimination and the decomposition of wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 5-21, March.
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