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Initial and Subsequent Location Choices of Immigrants to the Netherlands

Author

Listed:
  • Zorlu, Aslan

    () (University of Amsterdam)

  • Mulder, Clara H.

    () (University of Groningen)

Abstract

The initial settlement behaviour and the subsequent mobility of immigrants who arrived in the Netherlands in 1999 are examined using rich administrative individual data. The study considers the settlement patterns of immigrants from various countries of origin who entered the country as labour, family or asylum migrants. The evidence suggests distinct settlement trajectories for asylum and other non-western immigrants. The presence of co-ethnics and members of other ethnic minorities, but also socioeconomic neighbourhood characteristics, appear to play an important role in determining location choice. Differences in the settlement and spatial mobility patterns of immigrants with various degrees of distance from the native Dutch in terms of human and financial capital, proficiency in the relevant language(s), and religion confirm the main predictions of spatial assimilation theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Zorlu, Aslan & Mulder, Clara H., 2007. "Initial and Subsequent Location Choices of Immigrants to the Netherlands," IZA Discussion Papers 3036, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3036
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joop Hartog & Aslan Zorlu, 2009. "How important is homeland education for refugees’ economic position in The Netherlands?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(1), pages 219-246, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Konstantinos Pouliakas & Deborah Roberts & Eudokia Balamou & Dimitris Psaltopoulos, 2014. "Modelling the Effects of Immigration on Regional Economic Performance and Wage Distribution: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Analysis of Three European Union Regions," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 318-338, February.
    2. repec:bla:presci:v:96:y:2017:i:4:p:759-784 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Roberts, Deborah & Balamou, Eudokia & Psaltopoulos, Dimitris, 2008. "Modelling the Effects of Immigration on Regional Economic Performance and the Wage Distribution: A CGE Analysis of Three EU Regions," MPRA Paper 14157, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Aslan Zorlu & Ruben Gaalen, 2016. "Leaving Home and Destination of Early Nest Leavers: Ethnicity, Spaces and Prices," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(2), pages 267-291, May.
    5. Karina Schaake & Jack Burgers & Clara Mulder, 2010. "Ethnicity at the Individual and Neighborhood Level as an Explanation for Moving Out of the Neighborhood," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(4), pages 593-608, August.
    6. Ong, C., 2014. "Tipping points? Ethnic composition change in Dutch big city neighbourhoods," MERIT Working Papers 011, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    7. Natasha T. Duncan & Brigitte S. Waldorf, 2016. "Immigrant selectivity, immigrant performance and the macro-economic context," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(3), pages 127-143, August.
    8. Aslan Zorlu & Clara Mulder, 2011. "Ethnic Differences in Leaving Home: Timing and Pathways," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 49-72, February.
    9. Govert Bijwaard & Christian Schluter, 2016. "Interdependent Hazards, Local Interactions, and the Return Decision of Recent Migrants," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1620, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    10. repec:spr:eurpop:v:34:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10680-018-9479-z is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigrants and ethnic residential segregation; location choice;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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