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Forty Years of Immigrant Segregation in France, 1968-2007: How Different Is the New Immigration?

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  • Pan Ké Shon, Jean-Louis

    () (CREST-LSQ)

  • Verdugo, Gregory

    () (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Abstract

Analysing restricted access census data, this paper examines the long-term trends of immigrant segregation in France from 1968 to 2007. Similar to other European countries, France experienced a rise in the proportion of immigrants in its population that was characterised by a new predominance of non-European immigration. Despite this, average segregation levels remained moderate. While the number of immigrant enclaves increased, particularly during the 2000s, the average concentration for most groups decreased because of a reduction of heavily concentrated census tracts and census tracts with few immigrants. Contradicting frequent assertions, neither mono-ethnic census tract nor ghettoes exist in France. By contrast, many immigrants live in census tracts characterised by a low proportion of immigrants from their own group and from all origins. A long residential period in France is correlated with lower concentrations and proportion of immigrants in the census tract for most groups, though these effects are sometimes modest.

Suggested Citation

  • Pan Ké Shon, Jean-Louis & Verdugo, Gregory, 2014. "Forty Years of Immigrant Segregation in France, 1968-2007: How Different Is the New Immigration?," IZA Discussion Papers 8062, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8062
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Platt Boustan & Katherine Eriksson, 2012. "Europe's Tired, Poor, Huddled Masses: Self-Selection and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 1832-1856, August.
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    4. Gregory Verdugo, 2016. "Public housing magnets: public housing supply and immigrants’ location choices," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 237-265.
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    Cited by:

    1. Benoît Schmutz, 2015. "Spatial sorting of African Immigrants in the French Public Housing Market," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 42(3), pages 247-270, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    France; spatial segregation; immigration;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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