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Public Housing and Residential Segregation of Immigrants in France, 1968-1999

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  • Verdugo, Gregory

    () (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Abstract

This paper studies the evolution of the residential segregation of immigrants between and within urban areas in France from 1968 to 1999 using census data. During this period, European and non-European immigrant segregation followed diverging trends. This paper documents the large increase in public housing participation rates of non-European immigrants after 1980 and highlights how public housing participation is related to contemporary segregation. At the macro-geographical level, results indicate a decrease in the concentration of immigrants across urban areas, showing a lower concentration of non-European immigrants living in public housing across urban areas. Within cities, national origin segregation was predominant until 1968 for all groups and declined afterward, particularly for European immigrants. For non-European immigrants participating in public housing, the decline in segregation by national origin has been counterbalanced by an increase in regional segregation. Immigrants of different national origins have increasingly clustered in the same public housing neighborhoods. In 1999, immigrants in public housing experienced higher segregation levels than immigrants in private housing, particularly non-European immigrants. I find no relationship between differences in average arrival year and differences in segregation levels across immigrant groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Verdugo, Gregory, 2011. "Public Housing and Residential Segregation of Immigrants in France, 1968-1999," IZA Discussion Papers 5456, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5456
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2008. "Is the Melting Pot Still Hot? Explaining the Resurgence of Immigrant Segregation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 478-497.
    2. Sako Musterd & Roger Andersson & George Galster & Timo M Kauppinen, 2008. "Are immigrants’ earnings influenced by the characteristics of their neighbours?," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 40(4), pages 785-805, April.
    3. Abdurrahman Aydemir & George J. Borjas, 2011. "Attenuation Bias in Measuring the Wage Impact of Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 69-113, January.
    4. Federico Echenique & Roland G. Fryer, 2007. "A Measure of Segregation Based on Social Interactions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 441-485.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Bruno Decreuse & Morgane Laouénan & Alain Trannoy, 2016. "Customer Discrimination and Employment Outcomes: Theory and Evidence from the French Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(1), pages 107-160.
    2. Jean-Louis Pan Ké Shon, 2011. "Residential segregation of immigrants in France: an over view," Population and Societies 477, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    3. Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús & Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada & Saiz, Albert, 2017. "Immigrant Locations and Native Residential Preferences: Emerging Ghettos or New Communities?," IZA Discussion Papers 11143, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Gregory Verdugo, 2016. "Public housing magnets: public housing supply and immigrants’ location choices," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 237-265.
    5. Ong, C., 2014. "Tipping points? Ethnic composition change in Dutch big city neighbourhoods," MERIT Working Papers 011, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    6. Gregory Verdugo, 2011. "Fragmentation urbaine et chocs économiques : deux déterminants de l’offre de logements sociaux en France," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 446(1), pages 3-24.
    7. Lincoln Quillian & Hugues Lagrange, 2016. "Socioeconomic Segregation in Large Cities in France and the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(4), pages 1051-1084, August.
    8. François Bonnet & Etienne Lalé & Mirna Safi & Etienne Wasmer, 2015. "Better residential than ethnic discrimination!," Working Papers hal-01205219, HAL.
    9. François Bonnet & Etienne Lalé & Mirna Safi & Etienne Wasmer, 2015. "Better residential than ethnic discrimination! Reconciling audit's findings and interviews' findings in the Parisian housing market," Sciences Po publications 36, Sciences Po.
    10. Pascaline Vincent & Frédéric Chantreuil & Benoït Tarroux, 2012. "Appraising the breakdown of unequal individuals in large French cities," Economics Working Paper Archive (University of Rennes 1 & University of Caen) 201220, Center for Research in Economics and Management (CREM), University of Rennes 1, University of Caen and CNRS.
    11. Jean-Louis Pan Ké Shon & Gregory Verdugo, 2015. "Forty years of immigrant segregation in France, 1968–2007. How different is the new immigration?," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 52(5), pages 823-840, April.
    12. Benoît Schmutz, 2015. "Spatial sorting of African Immigrants in the French Public Housing Market," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 42(3), pages 247-270, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    segregation; immigration; public housing; France;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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