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Random–Walk–Based Segregation Measures

Author

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  • Marc Vorsatz
  • Pablo Coralio Ballester

Abstract

In this paper, we propose an intuitive way of how to measure residential segregation. Individuals are located in different nodes on a network that are interconnected through links. Each period, an individual either advances to an adjacent node or she stops moving. In this setting, the segregation index is then defined as the probability that a randomly chosen individual meets an individual of the same social group in the neighborhood where her random-walk terminates. It is shown in a dual theorem that the segregation index is as a natural generalization of the isolation index to networks and that it is proportional to the PageRank index applied by Google in order to determine the importance of web-pages. Finally, the segregation index is applied to the Spanish 2009 census tract data and compared with other prominent measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Marc Vorsatz & Pablo Coralio Ballester, 2010. "Random–Walk–Based Segregation Measures," Working Papers 2010-30, FEDEA.
  • Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2010-30
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Federico Echenique & Roland G. Fryer, 2007. "A Measure of Segregation Based on Social Interactions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(2), pages 441-485.
    2. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser, 1997. "Are Ghettos Good or Bad?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 827-872.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Casilda Vega & Oscar Volij, 2014. "Segregation, informativeness and Lorenz dominance," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 43(3), pages 547-564, October.
    2. Oscar Volij, 2018. "Segregation: theoretical approaches," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Economic and Social Well-Being, chapter 21, pages 480-503 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro & Matt Taddy, 2016. "Measuring Group Differences in High-Dimensional Choices: Method and Application to Congressional Speech," NBER Working Papers 22423, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Mariano Bosch & M. Carnero & Lídia Farré, 2015. "Rental housing discrimination and the persistence of ethnic enclaves," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 129-152, June.
    5. Michael D. König & Dominic Rohner & Mathias Thoenig & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2017. "Networks in Conflict: Theory and Evidence From the Great War of Africa," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 85, pages 1093-1132, July.
    6. Abhimanyu Khan & Ronald Peeters & Frank Thuijsman & Philippe Uyttendaele, 2016. "Network Characteristics Enabling Efficient Coordination: A Simulation Study," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 495-519, December.
    7. repec:spr:metron:v:75:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s40300-017-0112-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Sergio Currarini, & Elena Fumagalli & Fabrizio Panebianco, 2012. "Games on Networks: Direct Complements and Indirect Substitutes," Discussion Papers in Economics 13/04, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    9. Hannu Salonen, 2016. "Equilibria and centrality in link formation games," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 45(4), pages 1133-1151, November.
    10. Gauvin, Laetitia & Vignes, Annick & Nadal, Jean-Pierre, 2013. "Modeling urban housing market dynamics: Can the socio-spatial segregation preserve some social diversity?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 1300-1321.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C0 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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