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Age at Arrival and Assimilation during the Age of Mass Migration

Author

Listed:
  • Rohan Alexander
  • Zachary Ward

Abstract

We estimate the effect of age at arrival for immigrant outcomes with a new dataset of arrivals linked to the 1940 United States Census. Using within-family variation, we find that arriving at an older age, or having more childhood exposure to the European environment, led to a more negative wage gap relative to the native born. Infant arrivals had a positive wage gap relative to natives, in contrast to a negative gap for teenage arrivals. Therefore, a key determinant of immigrant outcomes during the Age of Mass Migration was the country of residence during critical periods of childhood development.

Suggested Citation

  • Rohan Alexander & Zachary Ward, 2018. "Age at Arrival and Assimilation during the Age of Mass Migration," CEH Discussion Papers 03, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:hpaper:064
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    File URL: https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/ceh/WP201803.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Age at arrival; Assimilation; Childhood environment.;

    JEL classification:

    • N31 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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