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The Performance of Immigrants in the Canadian Labor Market

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  • Baker, Michael
  • Benjamin, Dwayne

Abstract

In this article, the authors examine the economic assimilation of immigrants to Canada. They provide new evidence on immigrants who arrived in the 1970s and document an increase in the dispersion of labor market outcomes across immigrants of different vintages over time. The authors' results confirm U.S. evidence of permanent differences across immigrant cohorts. What distinguishes the Canadian experience is small or negative rates of assimilation for most cohorts over the sample period. Finally, the authors test the overidentification of the assimilation process specified in previous studies and fail to reject the usual cohort fixed-effect specification. Copyright 1994 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Baker, Michael & Benjamin, Dwayne, 1994. "The Performance of Immigrants in the Canadian Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(3), pages 369-405, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:12:y:1994:i:3:p:369-405
    DOI: 10.1086/298349
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
    2. Borjas, George J, 1985. "Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 463-489, October.
    3. Michael G. Abbott & Charles M. Beach, 1993. "Immigrant Earnings Differentials and Birth-Year Effects for Men in Canada: Post-war-1972," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 26(3), pages 505-524, August.
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