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Investment, Capacity, and Uncertainty: A Putty-Clay Approach

Author

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  • Simon Gilchrist

    (Boston University)

  • John C. Williams

    (Federal Reserve Board)

Abstract

This paper introduces Heckscher-Ohlin trade features into a two-country dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model, and studies the international transmission of productivity shocks through trade in goods. This framework improves upon existing international real business cycle models in that it generates business cycle properties comparable with the empirical evidence regarding the terms of trade and the trade balance. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Gilchrist & John C. Williams, 2005. "Investment, Capacity, and Uncertainty: A Putty-Clay Approach," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 8(1), pages 1-27, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:v:8:y:2005:i:1:p:1-27
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2004.06.002
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    vintage capital; irreversibility; capacity utilization; productivity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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