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Aggregate productivity and the allocation of resources over the business cycle

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  • Sophie Osotimehin

    (UQAM)

Abstract

This paper proposes a novel decomposition of aggregate productivity to evaluate the role of allocative efficiency for the cyclical dynamics of aggregate productivity. The decomposition, which is derived from the aggregation of heterogeneous firm-level production functions, accounts for changes in allocative efficiency, as well as for changes in entry and exit. This approach thereby extends Solow's (1957) growth accounting exercise to a framework with firm heterogeneity and frictions in the allocation of resources across firms. I apply the decomposition to a comprehensive dataset of French manufacturing and service firms, and I find that entry and exit contribute little to the year-on-year variability of sectoral productivity, between-sector allocative efficiency plays a limited role for the volatility of aggregate productivity, whereas within-sector allocative efficiency is countercyclical and tends to reduce the volatility of sectoral productivity. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Sophie Osotimehin, 2019. "Aggregate productivity and the allocation of resources over the business cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 32, pages 180-205, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:18-241
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2019.02.003
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Julian di Giovanni & Andrei A. Levchenko & Isabelle Mejean, 2014. "Firms, Destinations, and Aggregate Fluctuations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82(4), pages 1303-1340, July.
    2. In Hwan Jo & Tatsuro Senga, 2016. "Firm Dynamics, Misallocation and Targeted Policies," Working Papers 809, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    3. Shenoy, Ajay, 2017. "Market failures and misallocation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 65-80.
    4. Thomas Philippon & Ariell Reshef, 2013. "An International Look at the Growth of Modern Finance," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(2), pages 73-96, Spring.
    5. Sophie Osotimehin & Latchezar Popov, 2018. "Misallocation and intersectoral linkages," 2018 Meeting Papers 561, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. J. David Brown & Emin Dinlersoz & John S. Earle, 2016. "Does Higher Productivity Dispersion Imply Greater Misallocation?A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 16-42, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    7. David Zeke & Robert Kurtzman, 2016. "Accounting for Productivity Dispersion over the Business Cycle," 2016 Meeting Papers 482, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Glenn Magerman & Karolien De Bruyne & Emmanuel Dhyne & Jan Van Hove, 2016. "Heterogeneous Firms and the Micro Origins of Aggregate Fluctuations," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2016-35, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    9. Russell Cooper & Immo Schott, 2018. "Captial Reallocation and Productivity," 2018 Meeting Papers 121, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Aggregate productivity; Allocative efficiency; Business cycle; Resource allocation; entry and exit; Cleansing;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity

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