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International Comparisons of Cattle Cycles


  • Yair Mundlak
  • He Huang


The time-series properties of cattle production in three countries with different technologies, Argentina, the United States, and Uruguay, are studied in order to shed light on the role of technology in the dynamics of the cattle sector. Four series are analyzed for each country, slaughter, price, stock of cows, and total herd. Spectral decomposition of the time series shows the existence of cycles having surprising regularity for all the four time series. The three countries exhibit very similar cyclicities in spite of their different technologies and economic environment. Copyright 1996, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Yair Mundlak & He Huang, 1996. "International Comparisons of Cattle Cycles," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(4), pages 855-868.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:78:y:1996:i:4:p:855-868

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Aadland, David, 2004. "Cattle cycles, heterogeneous expectations and the age distribution of capital," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(10), pages 1977-2002, September.
    2. Yeboah, Osei-Agyeman & Ofori-Boadu, Victor & Salifou, Samaila, 2009. "A Foot and Mouth Disease Induced Model of US Excess Supply of Beef," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46053, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Shu-Ling Chen & John D. Jackson & Hyeongwoo Kim & Pramesti Resiandini, 2014. "What Drives Commodity Prices?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1455-1468.
    4. Francis X. Diebold & Lee E. Ohanian & Jeremy Berkowitz, 1998. "Dynamic Equilibrium Economies: A Framework for Comparing Models and Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(3), pages 433-451.
    5. David Aadland & DeeVon Bailey & S. Feng, "undated". "A theoretical and empirical investigation of the supply response in the U.S. beef-cattle industry," Working Papers 2000-12, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Griffith, Garry & Alford, Andrew R., 2000. "Outlook for the Australian beef industry," 2000 Conference (44th), January 23-25, 2000, Sydney, Australia 171910, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    7. David Aadland, "undated". "The economics of cattle supply," Working Papers 2000-11, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Mathews, Kenneth H., Jr. & Short, Sara D., 2001. "The Beef Cow Replacement Decision," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 19(2).
    9. Mbaga, Msafiri Daudi & Coyle, Barry T., 2003. "Beef Supply Response Under Uncertainty: An Autoregressive Distributed Lag Model," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 28(03), December.
    10. Aadland, David, 2002. "Cattle Cycles, Expectations And The Age Distribution Of Capital," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19795, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    11. Edgar E. Twine & James Rude & Jim Unterschultz, 2016. "Canadian Cattle Cycles and Market Shocks," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 64(1), pages 119-146, March.
    12. Omar Enrique Castillo Nuñez, 2008. "Comportamiento de los precios del ganado hembra de levante de primera clase en Montería y Sincelejo (Colombia)," REVISTA FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS ECONÓMICAS, UNIVERSIDAD MILITAR NUEVA GRANADA, December.
    13. Chavas, Jean-Paul, 2000. "On information and market dynamics: The case of the U.S. beef market," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(5-7), pages 833-853, June.
    14. Rezitis, Anthony N. & Stavropoulos, Konstantinos S., 2010. "Modeling beef supply response and price volatility under CAP reforms: The case of Greece," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 163-174, April.
    15. Riley, John Michael & Williams, Brian R., 2013. "Cow-Calf Industry Expansion on the Horizon? Market Signals vs. Outside Factors," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 143044, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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