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Maxing Out: An Analysis of Local Option Sales Tax Rate Increases

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  • Luna, LeAnn
  • Bruce, Donald J.
  • Hawkins, Richard R.

Abstract

We examine why and when some local governments choose to reach a legal sales tax rate maximum while others do not. We employ a duration model to study Tennessee local option sales taxes between 1975 and 1999. Our results show that between 1975 and 1984, counties with lower sales tax capacity were more likely to raise their sales tax rates to the maximum allowed by state law. However, between 1985 and 1999, counties with lower property tax capacity or a larger share of Republican voters were more likely to reach the maximum sales tax rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Luna, LeAnn & Bruce, Donald J. & Hawkins, Richard R., 2007. "Maxing Out: An Analysis of Local Option Sales Tax Rate Increases," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 60(1), pages 45-63, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:60:y:2007:i:1:p:45-63
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Agrawal, David R., 2014. "LOST in America: Evidence on local sales taxes from national panel data," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 147-163.
    2. Saxon, Nicholas & Tosun, Mehmet S. & Yang, Jingjing, 2015. "State and Local Sales Taxes and Business Activity in the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 9413, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Rohlin, Shawn M. & Thompson, Jeffrey P., 2018. "Local sales taxes, employment, and tax competition," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 373-383.
    4. Stine, William F., 2010. "Estimating the Determinants of Property Reassessment Duration: An Empirical Study of Pennsylvania Counties," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 40(2), pages 1-17.
    5. Shawn M. Rohlin & Jeffrey P. Thompson, 2013. "The effect of state and local sales taxes on employment at state borders," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-49, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), revised 2013.
    6. Whitney B. Afonso, 2017. "State LST Laws: A Comprehensive Analysis of the Laws Governing Local Sales Taxes," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(4), pages 25-46, December.
    7. Burge, Gregory & Rogers, Cynthia, 2011. "Local option sales taxes and consumer spending patterns: Fiscal interdependence under multi-tiered local taxation," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 46-58, January.
    8. Melissa Gentry & Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley & Shawn M. Rohlin & Jeffrey P. Thompson, 2020. "Dynamic Sales Tax Competition: Evidence from Panel Data at the Border," Working Papers 20-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    9. Propheter Geoffrey, 2015. "Political Institutions and State Sales Tax Base Erosion," Statistics, Politics and Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1-2), pages 1-17, December.

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