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Credibility and Flexibility with Independent Monetary Policy Committees

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  • Mihov, Ilian
  • Sibert, Anne

Abstract

Independent monetary policy committees are a simple way of attaining relatively low inflation without completely sacrificing an activist role for monetary policy. If central bankers' types are unknown, then for a wide range of parameters an independent committee achieves higher social welfare than either a zero-inflation rule or discretionary policy conducted by an opportunistic central banker. A key reason for the committee's superior performance is that committee members are relatively likely to opt for low inflation and building a reputation when shocks are small. When large shocks hit the economy, the incentive to react outweighs the reputation-building benefit.

Suggested Citation

  • Mihov, Ilian & Sibert, Anne, 2006. "Credibility and Flexibility with Independent Monetary Policy Committees," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 23-46, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:38:y:2006:i:1:p:23-46
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/mcb.2006.0021
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Hansen & Michael McMahon & Carlos Velasco Rivera, 2013. "How Expoerts Decide: Preferences or Private Assessments on a Monetary Policy Committee?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4201, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Hahn, Volker, 2016. "Designing monetary policy committees," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 47-67.
    3. Alexander Jung & Gergely Kiss, 2012. "Voting by monetary policy committees: evidence from the CEE inflation-targeting countries," MNB Working Papers 2012/2, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
    4. Ehrmann, Michael & Fratzscher, Marcel, 2007. "Social value of public information: testing the limits to transparency," Working Paper Series 821, European Central Bank.
    5. Michael Ehrmann & Marcel Fratzscher, 2013. "Dispersed communication by central bank committees and the predictability of monetary policy decisions," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 157(1), pages 223-244, October.
    6. Alexander Mihailov & Katrin Ullrich, 2015. "Institution Design for Macroeconomic Policy," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2015-01, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    7. Keiichi Morimoto, 2009. "Optimal Structure of Monetary Policy Committees," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 09-36, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    8. Buiter, Willem, 2014. "Central Banks: Powerful, Political and Unaccountable?," MPRA Paper 59477, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Esteban Colla de Robertis, 2010. "Monetary Policy Committees and the Decision to Publish Voting Records," Money Affairs, Centro de Estudios Monetarios Latinoamericanos, vol. 0(2), pages 97-139, July-Dece.
    10. Carsten Hefeker & Blandine Zimmer, 2015. "Optimal Conservatism and Collective Monetary Policymaking under Uncertainty," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 259-278, April.
    11. Jung, Alexander & Kiss, Gergely, 2012. "Preference heterogeneity in the CEE inflation-targeting countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 445-460.
    12. Gerlach-Kristen, Petra, 2008. "Taking two steps at a time: On the optimal pattern of policy interest rates," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 550-570, February.
    13. Eslava, Marcela, 2010. "Central bankers in government appointed committees," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(5-6), pages 363-379, June.
    14. Issing, Otmar, 2018. "Stabiles Geld - eine Illusion? Alternative Währungssysteme - Hayeks Fundamentalkritik - Unabhängigkeit der Notenbanken," SAFE White Paper Series 52, Goethe University Frankfurt, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe.
    15. Hansen, Stephen & McMahon, Michael & Velasco Rivera, Carlos, 2014. "Preferences or private assessments on a monetary policy committee?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 16-32.

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