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“Another roof, another proof”: the impact of mobility on individual productivity in science

Author

Listed:
  • Valentina Tartari

    () (Copenhagen Business School)

  • Francesco Di Lorenzo

    (Copenhagen Business School)

  • Benjamin A. Campbell

    (The Ohio State University)

Abstract

The mobility of highly skilled employees is seen as a critical way for organizations to transfer knowledge and to improve organizational performance. Yet, the relationship between mobility and individual performance is still largely a theoretical and empirical puzzle. Integrating human capital mobility research and the economics of science literature, we argue that mobility of academics should have a positive effect on individual productivity. Additionally, we argue that this positive effect is strengthened when academics move towards better-endowed institutions. We find support for our predictions using a unique dataset of 348 academics working in biology department in the United Kingdom supplemented with qualitative evidence from a survey of the focal academic researchers.

Suggested Citation

  • Valentina Tartari & Francesco Di Lorenzo & Benjamin A. Campbell, 2020. "“Another roof, another proof”: the impact of mobility on individual productivity in science," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 276-303, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:45:y:2020:i:1:d:10.1007_s10961-018-9681-5
    DOI: 10.1007/s10961-018-9681-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Mobility; Academic researchers; Scientific productivity; Organizational resources; Arellano–Bond;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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