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The Importance of the Indirect Transfer Mechanism for Consumer Willingness to Pay for Fair Trade Products—Evidence from a Natural Field Experiment

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  • Hannes Koppel

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  • Günther Schulze

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Abstract

A natural field experiment is conducted on the determinants of consumer’s willingness to pay for “fair trade” (FT) products. In four treatments, subjects are offered different choices in connection with a coffee purchase, such as buying regular coffee or FT coffee at a premium, regular coffee with or without a premium, or donating directly or not donating. Depending on the treatment, the premium or direct donations are either given to FT or a well-known charity. A large part of the willingness to pay a premium for FT coffee over regular coffee is shown to be not related to the specific attributes of FT coffee but rather caused by the indirect transfer mechanism that FT uses, i.e., selling products at a premium which goes to the cause of FT. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Hannes Koppel & Günther Schulze, 2013. "The Importance of the Indirect Transfer Mechanism for Consumer Willingness to Pay for Fair Trade Products—Evidence from a Natural Field Experiment," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 369-387, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jcopol:v:36:y:2013:i:4:p:369-387
    DOI: 10.1007/s10603-013-9234-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jana Friedrichsen & Dirk Engelmann, 2017. "Who Cares about Social Image?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1634, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Kreye, Melissa M. & Adams, Damian C. & Escobedo, Francisco J. & Soto, José R., 2016. "Does policy process influence public values for forest-water resource protection in Florida?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 122-131.
    3. Friedrichsen, Jana & Engelmann, Dirk, 2013. "Who cares for social image? Interactions between intrinsic motivation and social image concerns," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79746, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Van Loo, Ellen J. & Caputo, Vincenzina & Nayga, Rodolfo M. & Seo, Han-Seok & Zhang, Baoyue & Verbeke, Wim, 2015. "Sustainability labels on coffee: Consumer preferences, willingness-to-pay and visual attention to attributes," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 215-225.
    5. Elofsson, Katarina & Bengtsson, Niklas & Matsdotter, Elina & Arntyr, Johan, 2016. "The impact of climate information on milk demand: Evidence from a field experiment," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 14-23.
    6. repec:eee:joepsy:v:61:y:2017:i:c:p:134-144 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Fair Trade; Donation; Altruism; Transfer Mechanism;

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