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On the Channels of Pro-Social Behavior Evidence from a natural field experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Hannes Koppel

    (Max-Planck-Institute of Economics, Jena)

  • Günther G. Schulze

    (Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg)

Abstract

We conduct a natural field experiment on direct and indirect transfer mechanisms for small donations. Charitable contributions are significantly higher if made indirectly, i.e. if they are tied to the purchase of a good sold at a premium, than if they are made directly. Donations are signficantly higher under both transfer mechanisms if people are given a suggested reference donatio

Suggested Citation

  • Hannes Koppel & Günther G. Schulze, 2009. "On the Channels of Pro-Social Behavior Evidence from a natural field experiment," Jena Economic Research Papers 2009-102, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2009-102
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Friedrichsen, Jana & Engelmann, Dirk, 2013. "Who cares for social image? Interactions between intrinsic motivation and social image concerns," VfS Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79746, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tied versus untied transfers; charitable donations; charity; willingness to give; pro social behavior;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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