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Occupational structures across 25 EU countries: the importance of industry structure and technology in old and new EU countries

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  • Frank Cörvers

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  • Jaanika Meriküll

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Abstract

This paper analyzes the occupational structures of 25 European Union countries during the period 2000-2004. Shift-share analyses have been used to decompose cross-country differences in occupational structure into within industry and between industry effects. The static analysis for 2004 shows that the new Member States employ a lower share of skilled workers because their industry structure is biased towards less skill-intensive industries and because they use fewer skills within industries. The differences in the shares of (high-skilled) non-production workers are dominated by the between (industrial) effect. In contrast, the dynamic analysis of 2000-2004 shows that changes in the share of high-skilled non-production workers are mostly driven by within industry changes, which are probably related to skill-biased technological change. The results indicate the weakening of this process, at least for non-production workers. The diffusion of the increased demand for skills within sectors is witnessed for the higher income EU12 country group, but less strongly for the EU25 country group.
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Suggested Citation

  • Frank Cörvers & Jaanika Meriküll, 2007. "Occupational structures across 25 EU countries: the importance of industry structure and technology in old and new EU countries," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 327-359, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ecopln:v:40:y:2007:i:4:p:327-359
    DOI: 10.1007/s10644-008-9035-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. František Střeleček & Radek Zdeněk & Jana Lososová, 2010. "Vývoj zaměstnanosti v znevýhodněných oblastech v letech 2002-2006
      [Development of Employment in Less Favoured Areas in 2002-2006]
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(6), pages 761-773.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Occupational structure; Industry structure; Technological change; Technology diffusion; Transition economies; J21; J24; O33; P23;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population

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