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Skill Classification and the Effects of Trade on Wage Inequality


  • Niven Winchester
  • David Greenaway


  • Geoffrey V. Reed


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Niven Winchester & David Greenaway & Geoffrey V. Reed, 2006. "Skill Classification and the Effects of Trade on Wage Inequality," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 142(2), pages 287-306, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:weltar:v:142:y:2006:i:2:p:287-306
    DOI: 10.1007/s10290-006-0068-6

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Francois, Joseph F & Nelson, Douglas, 1998. "Trade, Technology, and Wages: General Equilibrium Mechanics," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(450), pages 1483-1499, September.
    2. Haskel, Jonathan & Slaughter, Matthew J, 2001. "Trade, Technology and U.K. Wage Inequality," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(468), pages 163-187, January.
    3. Liu, Jing & Nico van Leeuwen & Tri Thanh Vo & Rod Tyers & Thomas W. Hertel, 1998. "Disaggregating Labor Payments by Skill Level in GTAP," GTAP Technical Papers 314, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
    4. R. E. Baldwin & G. G. Cain, "undated". "Shifts in U.S. Relative Wages: The Role of Trade, Technology, and Factor Endowments," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1132-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    5. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Howard J. Shatz, 1994. "Trade and Jobs in Manufacturing," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(1), pages 1-84.
    6. Ethier, Wilfred J., 1984. "Higher dimensional issues in trade theory," Handbook of International Economics,in: R. W. Jones & P. B. Kenen (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 3, pages 131-184 Elsevier.
    7. Abrego, Lisandro & Whalley, John, 2000. "The Choice of Structural Model in Trade-Wages Decompositions," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(3), pages 462-477, August.
    8. Falvey, R. & Tyers, R. & McDougall, R., 1997. "Trade Shocks and the Magnitude of Transmitted Wage Adjustments," Papers 318, Australian National University - Department of Economics.
    9. Roberto A. De Santis, 2003. "Wage Inequality in the United Kingdom: Trade and/or Technology?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(6), pages 893-909, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


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    Cited by:

    1. Tyers, Rod, 2015. "International effects of China's rise and transition: Neoclassical and Keynesian perspectives," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 1-19.
    2. Mirza, Tasneem & Narayanan, Badri & van Leeuwen, Nico, 2014. "Impact of Chinese growth and trade on labor in developed countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 522-532.
    3. Ochuodho, Thomas O. & Lantz, Van A. & Olale, Edward, 2016. "Economic impacts of climate change considering individual, additive, and simultaneous changes in forest and agriculture sectors in Canada: A dynamic, multi-regional CGE model analysis," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 43-51.
    4. Olivier Godart & Holger Görg & David Greenaway, 2013. "Domestic multinationals, foreign affiliates, and labour demand elasticities," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 149(4), pages 611-630, December.
    5. repec:eee:eneeco:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:192-198 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Asier Minondo & Francisco Requena, 2012. "Complexity as a source of comparative advantage," Working Papers 1214, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia.
    7. Keshab Bhattarai, 2016. "Growth and Income Distributions in Four EU Economies," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 22(3), pages 263-277, August.
    8. Frank Cörvers & Jaanika Meriküll, 2007. "Occupational structures across 25 EU countries: the importance of industry structure and technology in old and new EU countries," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 327-359, December.
    9. Keshab Raj BHATTARAI, "undated". "Dynamic Multi-Household General Economic Models for Policy Simulations: France, Germany, Spain and UK," EcoMod2009 21500014, EcoMod.
    10. Niven Winchester, 2006. "Trade and Rising Wage Inequality: What can we learn from a Decade of Computable General Equilibrium Analysis?," Working Papers 0606, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2006.
    11. Lihong Yun, 2008. "Technical Progress and Labour Demand in Swedish Manufacturing Firms," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 147-167, June.


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