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The Skill Shortage in German Establishments Before, During and After the Great Recession

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  • Bellmann Lutz

    () (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg and Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Regensburger Straße 104, 90478 Nuremberg, Germany)

  • Hübler Olaf

    () (Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Empirische Wirtschaftsforschung, Königsworter Platz 1, 30167 Hannover, Germany)

Abstract

This paper investigates the development of skill shortages during the period 2007-2012. Using the German Establishment Panel of the Institute for Employment Research (IAB), we find differences across the years before, during and after the Great Recession. Furthermore, we analyze the importance of firm characteristics and that of certain, specific measures with respect to the skill shortage.

Suggested Citation

  • Bellmann Lutz & Hübler Olaf, 2014. "The Skill Shortage in German Establishments Before, During and After the Great Recession," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 234(6), pages 800-828, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:234:y:2014:i:6:p:800-828
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Meyer, Wolgang, 2015. "Fachkräftemangel in Niedersachsen: Ein aktuelles Problem?," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-560, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    2. Kölling, Arnd, 2018. "It's not about adjustment costs: Estimating asymmetries in long-run labor demand using a fractional panel probit model," Working Papers 95, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute of Management Berlin (IMB).

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