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Firm-level Hiring Difficulties: Persistence, Business Cycle and Local Labour Market Influences

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  • Richard Fabling

    () (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

  • Maré, David C

    () (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

Abstract

We examine the correlates of reported hiring difficulties at the firm level using linked employer-employee and panel survey data over 2005-2011, focussing on the relative influence of firm-level characteristics, persistence, the business cycle and local labour market liquidity. At both the aggregate and the firm level, hiring difficulties eased after the onset of the Global Financial Crisis. Even in the presence of large cyclical changes in demand and labour market conditions, firm-level persistence is a dominant feature of the data, with one- and two-year lags of reported hiring difficulties both positively related to current difficulties. Firms paying higher wages are more likely to report difficulties when trying to hire skilled workers, while firms with more long tenure workers are less likely to report any difficulty hiring. Local labour market conditions appear unrelated to reported hiring difficulties.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Fabling & Maré, David C, 2013. "Firm-level Hiring Difficulties: Persistence, Business Cycle and Local Labour Market Influences," Working Papers 13_06, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:13_06
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard Fabling & David C. Maré, 2016. "Firm-Level Hiring Difficulties: Persistence, Business Cycle And Local Labour Market Influences," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 179-210, June.
    2. repec:taf:nzecpp:v:51:y:2017:i:3:p:302-326 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Fabling & David C. Maré, 2016. "Firm-Level Hiring Difficulties: Persistence, Business Cycle And Local Labour Market Influences," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 179-210, June.
    2. Seamus McGuinness & Luis Ortiz, 2016. "Skill gaps in the workplace: measurement, determinants and impacts," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 253-278, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    hiring difficulties; hard-to-fill vacancies; local labour market; Global Financial Crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions

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