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Identifying Functional Labour Market Areas in New Zealand: A Reconnaissance Study Using Travel-to-Work Data

Author

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  • Papps, Kerry L.

    () (University of Bath)

  • Newell, James O.

    (Monitoring and Evaluation Research Associates Ltd, Wellington)

Abstract

To date, analysis of the spatial dimension of New Zealand labour markets has been limited to administrative, rather than appropriately-defined functional, geographic units. This paper presents a preliminary classification of New Zealand into local labour market areas using area unit travel-to-work data from the 1991 Census of Population and Dwellings and drawing on the regionalisation method of Coombes et al. (1986). After assessing the robustness of the preferred set of local labour market areas, the paper provides some illustrative labour market statistics for these zones. Migration between labour market areas is most likely to be accompanied by changes in job, whereas moves within a labour market are largely assumed to be non-work motivated. As a result, this study provides a more appropriate spatial unit of analysis than any administrative classification for studying migration at a subnational level.

Suggested Citation

  • Papps, Kerry L. & Newell, James O., 2002. "Identifying Functional Labour Market Areas in New Zealand: A Reconnaissance Study Using Travel-to-Work Data," IZA Discussion Papers 443, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp443
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Crampton, Graham R., 1999. "Urban labour markets," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: P. C. Cheshire & E. S. Mills (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 39, pages 1499-1557 Elsevier.
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    7. David C Maré & Wai Kin Choy, 2001. "Regional Labour Market Adjustment and the Movements of People: A Review," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/08, New Zealand Treasury.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Fabling & David C. Maré, 2016. "Firm-Level Hiring Difficulties: Persistence, Business Cycle And Local Labour Market Influences," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 179-210, June.
    2. David C. Maré & Jason Timmins, 2006. "Geographic concentration and firm productivity," Working Papers 06_08, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    3. Isabelle Sin & Steven Stillman, 2016. "Economic liberalisation and the mobility of minority groups: evidence from Māori in New Zealand," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
    4. David Mare & Melanie Morten & Steven Stillman, 2007. "Settlement patterns and the geographic mobility of recent migrants to New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 163-195.
    5. David C. Maré & Steven Stillman, 2010. "The Impact of Immigration on the Geographic Mobility of New Zealanders," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(273), pages 247-259, June.
    6. David C Mare & Lynda Sanderson & Richard Fabling, 2014. "Earnings and Employment in Foreign-owned Firms," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/16, New Zealand Treasury.
    7. Sin, Isabelle & Stillman, Steven, 2017. "The Effect of Social Networks on the Economic Outcomes of a Disadvantaged Group: Evidence from Tribal Affiliations," IZA Discussion Papers 10803, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Mathias Sinning & Steve Stillman, 2012. "Where Should I Live? The Locational Choices of Australians and New Zealanders," Working Papers 1204, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2012.
    9. Stillman, Steven & Velamuri, Malathi & Aitken, Andrew, 2010. "The long-run impact of New Zealand's structural reform on local communities," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 432-448, December.
    10. Jacques Poot & Steven Stillman, 2010. "The importance of heterogeneity when examining immigrant education-occupation mismatch: evidence from New Zealand," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1023, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    11. David C. Maré & Richard Fabling & Steven Stillman, 2014. "Innovation and the local workforce," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(1), pages 183-201, March.
    12. Arthur Grimes & Suzi Kerr & Andrew Aitken, 2004. "Bi-Directions Impacts of Economic, Social and Environmental Changes and the New Zealand Housing Market," Working Papers 04_09, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    13. Isabelle Sin & Steven Stillman, 2005. "The Geographical Mobility of Maori in New Zealand," Working Papers 05_05, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    14. David C. Maré & Richard Fabling, 2011. "Productivity and Local Workforce Composition," Working Papers 11_10, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    15. Jacques Poot & Bill Cochrane & Sandra Baxendine, 2005. "Description and Spatial Analysis of Employment Change in New Zealand Regions 1986-2001," Population Studies Centre Discussion Papers dp-57, University of Waikato, Population Studies Centre.
    16. Kropp, Per & Schwengler, Barbara, 2017. "Stability of functional labour market regions," IAB Discussion Paper 201721, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    17. Isabelle Sin & Emma Brunton & Joanna Hendy & Suzi Kerr, 2005. "The likely regional impacts of an agricultural emissions policy in New Zealand: Preliminary analysis," Others 0509010, EconWPA.
    18. Frank Corvers & Maud Hensen & Dion Bongaerts, 2009. "Delimitation and Coherence of Functional and Administrative Regions," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(1), pages 19-31.
    19. Maré, Dave C. & Fabling, Richard & Stillman, Steven, 2011. "Immigration and Innovation," IZA Discussion Papers 5686, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    20. Chakraborty, A. & Beamonte, M.A. & Gelfand, A.E. & Alonso, M.P. & Gargallo, P. & Salvador, M., 2013. "Spatial interaction models with individual-level data for explaining labor flows and developing local labor markets," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 292-307.
    21. Mike Coombes & José M. Casado-Díaz, 2005. "The evolution of Local Labour Market Areas in contrasting region," ERSA conference papers ersa05p303, European Regional Science Association.
    22. Dimitris Kallioras & Yorgos Kandylis & Nikos Kromydakis & Panagiotis Pantazis, 2011. "Definition of Local Labor Market Areas in Greece on the Basis of Travel-to-Work Flows," ERSA conference papers ersa11p75, European Regional Science Association.
    23. Maré, David C & Fabling, Richard, 2013. "The incidence and persistence of cyclical job loss in New Zealand," Working Papers 13_08, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    24. Wai Kin Choy & David C Mare & Peter Mawson, 2002. "Modelling Regional Labour Market Adjustment in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/01, New Zealand Treasury.
    25. Zhiqiang Feng, 2009. "Fuzziness of Travel-to-Work Areas," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(5), pages 707-720.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Geographic labour mobility; regional migration; regional labour markets;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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