IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uam/wpaper/200805.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Commuting times: Is there any penalty for immigrants?

Author

Listed:
  • Blázquez, Maite

    () (Departamento de Análisis Económico (Teoría e Historia Económica). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.)

  • Llano, Carlos

    () (Departamento de Análisis Económico (Teoría e Historia Económica). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.)

  • Moral Carcedo, Julian

    () (Departamento de Análisis Económico: Teoría e Historia Económica. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Abstract

Studying the relation between workers’ nationality and their commuting time has been of paramount importance in countries with high immigration rates and ethnical heterogeneity. Most of these studies focus on the spatial mismatch of racial minorities, and consider urban and social structures of the countries/cities where this segregation phenomenon may occur.Currently, immigration is one of the main challenges of the Spanish society. Foreign residents in Madrid region increased 639 % between 1996 and 2004. In this paper we explore the connection between commuting time, residential location and worker’s nationality using an ordered logit model. Our findings reveal that immigrants from ‘transition economies’ and ‘third world’ countries are significantly more likely to suffer higher commuting times compared to natives. These differences can be explained by both housing and labour market restrictions due to discrimination. This commuting penalty is in line with the spatial mismatch hypothesis and residential segregation.

Suggested Citation

  • Blázquez, Maite & Llano, Carlos & Moral Carcedo, Julian, 2008. "Commuting times: Is there any penalty for immigrants?," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2008/05, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
  • Handle: RePEc:uam:wpaper:200805
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.uam.es/departamentos/economicas/analecon/especifica/mimeo/wp20085.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rouwendal, Jan, 1999. "Spatial job search and commuting distances," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 491-517, July.
    2. Epstein, Gil S., 2002. "Informational Cascades and Decision to Migrate," IZA Discussion Papers 445, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Louis de Mesnard, 2004. "Biproportional Methods of Structural Change Analysis: A Typological Survey," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 205-230.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David C. Ribar, 2013. "Immigrants’ time use: a survey of methods and evidence," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 20, pages 373-392 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús & Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada & Saiz, Albert, 2017. "Immigrant Locations and Native Residential Preferences: Emerging Ghettos or New Communities?," IZA Discussion Papers 11143, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Daniel Chatman, 2014. "Explaining the “immigrant effect” on auto use: the influences of neighborhoods and preferences," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 441-461, May.
    4. K. Bruce Newbold & Darren M. Scott & Charles Burke, 2017. "Immigrant status and commute distance: an exploratory study based on the greater Golden Horseshoe," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 181-198, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Commuting flows; Immigration; Spatial mismatch; Labour mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uam:wpaper:200805. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Andrés Maroto-Sánchez). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dauames.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.