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Now and forever? Initial and subsequent location choices of immigrants

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  • Åslund, Olof

    () (IFAU - Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation)

Abstract

This paper exploits a natural experiment to study the influence of regional factors on initial and subsequent location choices among immigrants. The results suggest that immigrants to Sweden are attracted to regions with high representation from the individual’s birth country and large overall immigrant populations. Labor market opportunities affect location decisions, but people also tend to choose localities with many welfare recipients. The impact of most regional factors does not change over time. Thus, there is little evidence that information improves or that preferences differ between initial and subsequent stages.

Suggested Citation

  • Åslund, Olof, 2001. "Now and forever? Initial and subsequent location choices of immigrants," Working Paper Series 2001:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2001_011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Madeline Zavodny, 1998. "Determinants of recent immigrants' locational choices," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 98-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Bruno Decreuse & Morgane Laouénan & Alain Trannoy, 2016. "Customer Discrimination and Employment Outcomes: Theory and Evidence from the French Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(1), pages 107-160.
    2. Gordon F. De Jong & Deborah Roempke Graefe, 2008. "Immigrant redistribution and life course trigger events: Evidence from US interstate migration," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 5(2), pages 123-134, October.
    3. Francesca Michielin & Clara H. Mulder, 2007. "Geographical distances between adult children and their parents in the Netherlands," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(22), pages 655-678, December.
    4. Shoag, Daniel & Carollo, Nicholas, 2016. "The Causal Effect of Place: Evidence from Japanese-American Internment," Working Paper Series 16-022, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    5. Olof Åslund & John Östh & Yves Zenou, 2010. "How important is access to jobs? Old question--improved answer," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 389-422, May.
    6. Martin Halla & Alexander F. Wagner & Josef Zweimüller, 2012. "Does Immigration into Their Neighborhoods Incline Voters Toward the Extreme Right? The Case of the Freedom Party of Austria," NRN working papers 2012-04, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    7. Or Levkovich & Jan Rouwendal, 2014. "Location Choices of highly Educated Foreign Workers: the Importance of Urban Amenities," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-093/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    8. Månsson, Jonas & Olsson, Mikael, 2010. "Mobility sans integration? An analysis of labor market attainment in Sweden among its post-war immigrants from Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland," CAFO Working Papers 2010:6, Linnaeus University, Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics.
    9. Neubecker, Nina & Smolka, Marcel, 2013. "Co-national and cross-national pulls in international migration to Spain," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 51-61.
    10. Alessandro Innocenti & Francesca Lorini & Chiara Rapallini, 2014. "Ethnic Heterogeneity, Voting Partecipation and Local Economic Growth. The Case of Belgium," Working Papers - Economics wp2014_03.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    11. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:1265-1286 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Neubecker, Nina & Smolka, Marcel, 2012. "Co-national and transnational networks in international migration to Spain," University of Tuebingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance 46, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.
    13. Gisela Waisman & Birthe Larsen, 2016. "Income, amenities and negative attitudes," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-32, December.
    14. Nina Neubecker & Marcel Smolka & Anne Steinbacher, 2017. "Networks And Selection In International Migration To Spain," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(3), pages 1265-1286, July.
    15. Carola Méndez Araya & Marcelo Lufin Varas, 2013. "¿Dónde están los inmigrantes en Chile?: Un análisis de Patrones Espaciales de Residencia por Municipalidades," Documentos de Trabajo en Economia y Ciencia Regional 38, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Chile, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2013.
    16. Michael Landesmann & Sandra M. Leitner, 2015. "Labour Mobility of Migrants and Natives in the European Union: An Empirical Test of the 'Greasing of the Wheels’ Effect of Migrants," wiiw Working Papers 119, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    17. Røed, Marianne & Schøne, Pål, 2012. "Does immigration increase labour market flexibility?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 527-540.
    18. Jeanne Lafortune & José Tessada, 2012. "Smooth(er) Landing? The Dynamic Role of Networks in the Location and Occupational Choice of Immigrants," Working Papers ClioLab 14, EH Clio Lab. Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.
    19. repec:wfo:wstudy:59156 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Wido Geis & Silke Uebelmesser & Martin Werding, 2013. "How do Migrants Choose Their Destination Country? An Analysis of Institutional Determinants," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(5), pages 825-840, November.
    21. Eva Arceo, 2010. "Job Search, Social Interactions and Labor Market Performance of Low-Skilled Immigrants," Working papers DTE 489, CIDE, División de Economía.
    22. Martin Halla & Alexander F. Wagner & Josef Zweimüller, 2012. "Immigration and voting for the extreme right," ECON - Working Papers 083, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Oct 2013.
    23. Michael Haan, 2008. "The Place of Place: Location and Immigrant Economic Well-being in Canada," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(6), pages 751-771, December.
    24. Peri, Giovanni & Romiti, Agnese & Rossi, Mariacristina, 2015. "Immigrants, domestic labor and women's retirement decisions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 18-34.
    25. Peri, Giovanni & Romiti, Agnese & Rossi, Mariacristina, 2013. "Immigrants, Household Production and Women's Retirement," IZA Discussion Papers 7549, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; location choice; secondary migration;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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