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Determinants of recent immigrants' locational choices

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  • Madeline Zavodny

Abstract

High levels of immigration to the United States have caused the size of the foreign-born population to increase dramatically in recent years. Recent immigrants are concentrated in several states, particularly California. This paper examines the determinants of the intended state of residence of new recipients of legal permanent-resident status and new refugees over the 1989-94 period. The presence of other foreign-born people is the primary determinant of the locational choices of new legal permanent residents, but there are some differences among immigrant groups by admission category and by country of origin. Only refugees' locations appear to be sensitive to welfare generosity.

Suggested Citation

  • Madeline Zavodny, 1998. "Determinants of recent immigrants' locational choices," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 98-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:98-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Buckley, F. H., 1996. "The political economy of immigration policies," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 81-99, March.
    2. Mary Kritz & June Nogle, 1994. "Nativity concentration and internal migration among the foreign-born," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(3), pages 509-524, August.
    3. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
    4. Randall Filer, 1992. "The Effect of Immigrant Arrivals on Migratory Patterns of Native Workers," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 245-270 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. John M. Abowd & Richard B. Freeman, 1991. "Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number abow91-1.
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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Nowotny, 2011. "Welfare Magnets, Taxation and the Location Decisions of Migrants to the EU," WIFO Working Papers 393, WIFO.
    2. Chiswick, Barry R. & Miller, Paul W., 2004. "Where Immigrants Settle in the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 1231, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Hou, Feng, 2005. "The Initial Destinations and Redistribution of Canada's Major Immigrant Groups: Changes over the Past Two Decades," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005254e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    4. Ethan Lewis, 2003. "Local, open economies within the U.S.: how do industries respond to immigration?," Working Papers 04-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    5. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Immigrants' Income and Family Migration," Umeå Economic Studies 625, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    6. Piil Damm, Anna, 2005. "Immigrants’ Location Preferences: Exploiting a Natural Experiment," Working Papers 05-2, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    7. Rob Euwals & Hans Roodenburg & J. Dagevos & M. Gijsberts, 2006. "Immigration, integration and the labour market; Turkish immigrants in Germany and the Netherlands," CPB Discussion Paper 75, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    8. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Internal migration and income of immigrant families," Umeå Economic Studies 624, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    9. Michael Haan, 2008. "The Place of Place: Location and Immigrant Economic Well-being in Canada," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(6), pages 751-771, December.
    10. Damm, Anna Piil & Rosholm, Michael, 2003. "Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies on Refugee Immigrants, Part II: Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 925, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. George J. Borjas, 2006. "Native Internal Migration and the Labor Market Impact of Immigration," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
    12. Sara Lemos & Jonathan Portes, 2008. "New Labour? The Impact of Migration from Central and Eastern European Countries on the UK Labour Market," Discussion Papers in Economics 08/29, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    13. Aslund, Olof, 2005. "Now and forever? Initial and subsequent location choices of immigrants," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 141-165, March.
    14. Piil Damm, Anna, 2005. "The Danish Dispersal Policy on Refugee Immigrants 1986-1998: A Natural Experiment?," Working Papers 05-3, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    15. Victoria Chorny & Rob Euwals & Kees Folmer, 2007. "Immigration policy and welfare state design; a qualitative approach to explore the interaction," CPB Document 153, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    16. Klaus Nowotny & Dieter Pennerstorfer, 2011. "Ethnic Networks and the Location Choice of Migrants in Europe," WIFO Working Papers 415, WIFO.
    17. Olof Åslund & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2007. "Do when and where matter? initial labour market conditions and immigrant earnings," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(518), pages 422-448, March.
    18. Antonio Cecchi & Enrico Giovannetti, 2006. "Spatial Mismatch and Mobility Involvements: a Common Approach for the Urban Sprawl Parma-Bologna," Center for the Analysis of Public Policies (CAPP) 0026, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Economia "Marco Biagi".
    19. Myriam Quispe-Agnoli & Madeline Zavodny, 2002. "The effect of immigration on output mix, capital, and productivity," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q1, pages 17-27.
    20. Laura Simich & Morton Beiser & Farah Mawani, 2002. "Paved with Good Intentions: Canada's Refugee Destining Policy and Paths of Secondary Migration," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 28(4), pages 597-607, December.
    21. Piil Damm, Anna & Rosholm, Michael, 2005. "Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies on Refugee Immigrants: Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 04-20, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.

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    Keywords

    Emigration and immigration ; Labor mobility;

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