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Immigrants’ Location Preferences: Exploiting a Natural Experiment

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  • Piil Damm, Anna

    () (Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business)

Abstract

This paper exploits a dispersal policy for refugee immigrants to estimate the importance of local and regional factors for refugees’ location preferences. The main results of a mixed proportional hazard competing risks model are that placed refugees react to high regional unemployment and lack of a local immigrant population by migrating to large municipalities. Lack of local fellow countrymen, however, increases the exit rate to medium-sized as well as large municipalities. This finding is likely to be a result of the dispersal policy. Finally, refugees react strongly to assignment to small municipalities by migrating mainly to medium-sized municipalities.

Suggested Citation

  • Piil Damm, Anna, 2005. "Immigrants’ Location Preferences: Exploiting a Natural Experiment," Working Papers 05-2, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2005_002 Note: Published as “Determinants of Recent Immigrants’ Location Choices: Quasi-Experimental Evidence”. Journal of Population Economics 2009, 22(1): 145-174
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    3. Damm, Anna Piil & Rosholm, Michael, 2003. "Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies on Refugee Immigrants, Part II: Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 925, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Jaap H. Abbring & Gerard J. Berg & Jan C. Ours, 2005. "The Effect of Unemployment Insurance Sanctions on the Transition Rate from Unemployment to Employment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(505), pages 602-630, July.
    5. B.R. Chiswick & P.W. Miller, 2000. "Do Enclaves Matter in Immigrant Adjustment?," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 00-19, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    6. Thomas Bauer & Gil Epstein & Ira Gang, 2005. "Enclaves, language, and the location choice of migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 649-662, November.
    7. Husted, Leif & Skyt Nielsen, Helena & Rosholm, Michael & Smith, Nina, 2000. "Employment and Wage Assimilation of Male First Generation Immigrants in Denmark," CLS Working Papers 00-1, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Centre for Labour Market and Social Research.
    8. Epstein, Gil S., 2002. "Informational Cascades and Decision to Migrate," IZA Discussion Papers 445, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Abbring, Jaap H. & Berg, Gerard J. van den, 2000. "The non-parametric identification of the mixed proportional hazards competing risks model," Serie Research Memoranda 0024, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    10. Madeline Zavodny, 1998. "Determinants of recent immigrants' locational choices," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 98-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    11. Bowles, Samuel, 1970. "Migration as Investment: Empirical Tests of the Human Investment Approach to Geographical Mobility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 52(4), pages 356-362, November.
    12. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-990, October.
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    14. Bartel, Ann P, 1989. "Where Do the New U.S. Immigrants Live?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(4), pages 371-391, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Damm, Anna Piil & Rosholm, Michael, 2003. "Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies on Refugee Immigrants, Part II: Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 925, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Teresa Casey & Christian Dustmann, 2008. "Intergenerational Transmission of Language Capital and Economic Outcomes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 4660-4687.
    3. Damm, Anna Piil & Rosholm, Michael, 2003. "Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies on Refugee Immigrants, Part I: Theory," IZA Discussion Papers 924, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Piil Damm, Anna & Rosholm, Michael, 2005. "Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies on Refugee Immigrants: Theory," Working Papers 05-1, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    5. Piil Damm, Anna & Rosholm, Michael, 2005. "Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies on Refugee Immigrants: Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 04-20, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Location Preferences; Internal Migration; Immigrants; Dispersal Policies; Duration Analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods

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