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The equalising power of internal immigration and the desertification process of southern Italy

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  • Giorgio Liotti
  • Salvatore Villani

Abstract

According to some scholars, immigration can have a relevant role in the reduction of inequality. It has happened in the past and it may also happen in the future, as it is possible and desirable. However, migration in itself does not resolve definitely the issue of the inequalities and, moreover, in light of the recent studies on the effect of immigration, the exigency of additional in depth research on the impact of this phenomenon on regional disparities and income inequalities has become evident. The present paper faces these relevant issues, focusing on the regional impact of internal migration and attempting to demonstrate, with reference to the Italian case, how out-migration can increase income inequalities, thus hindering economic growth and exacerbating regional disparities, while immigration can reduce income inequalities and mitigate economic imbalances, according to the hypothesis of skilled immigration equalising, formulated in 2008 by Kahanec and Zimmermann.

Suggested Citation

  • Giorgio Liotti & Salvatore Villani, 2014. "The equalising power of internal immigration and the desertification process of southern Italy," STUDI ECONOMICI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2014(114), pages 51-77.
  • Handle: RePEc:fan:steste:v:html10.3280/ste2014-114003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E64 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Incomes Policy; Price Policy
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General

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