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The Social Implications of Technology Diffusion: Uncovering the Unintended Consequences of People’s Health-Related Mobile Phone Use in Rural India and China

Listed author(s):
  • Haenssgen, Marco J.
  • Ariana, Proochista
Registered author(s):

    After three decades of mobile phone diffusion, thousands of mobile-phone-based health projects worldwide (“mHealth”), and hundreds of thousands of smartphone health applications, fundamental questions about the effect of phone diffusion on people’s healthcare behavior continue to remain unanswered. This study investigated whether, in the absence of specific mHealth interventions, people make different healthcare decisions if they use mobile phones during an illness. Following mainstream narratives, we hypothesized that phone use during an illness (a) increases and (b) accelerates healthcare access.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305750X17300281
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 94 (2017)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 286-304

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:94:y:2017:i:c:p:286-304
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2017.01.014
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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