IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/trapol/v60y2017icp1-9.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Econometric analysis of the link between public transport accessibility and employment

Author

Listed:
  • Johnson, Daniel
  • Ercolani, Marco
  • Mackie, Peter

Abstract

Modern transport policy analysis has ceased to be mainly about transport impacts and is now focussed on the effects of provision and policy upon the operation of the economy and society. For people on the edge of the labour market, many of whom do not have access to other forms of transport, public transport is a very important source of accessibility to jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Johnson, Daniel & Ercolani, Marco & Mackie, Peter, 2017. "Econometric analysis of the link between public transport accessibility and employment," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 1-9.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:60:y:2017:i:c:p:1-9
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2017.08.001
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967070X16303353
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stephen Gibbons & Teemu Lyytikäinen & Henry Overman & Rosa Sanchis-Guarner, 2012. "New Road Infrastructure: the Effects on Firms," SERC Discussion Papers 0117, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    2. Claire Dujardin & Harris Selod & Isabelle Thomas, 2008. "Residential Segregation and Unemployment: The Case of Brussels," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 45(1), pages 89-113, January.
    3. Evelyn Blumenberg & Gregory Pierce, 2014. "A Driving Factor in Mobility? Transportation's Role in Connecting Subsidized Housing and Employment Outcomes in the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) Program," Journal of the American Planning Association, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 80(1), pages 52-66, January.
    4. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn & Jordan Rappaport, 2000. "Why Do The Poor Live In Cities?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1891, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    5. Thomas W. Sanchez & Qing Shen & Zhong-Ren Peng, 2004. "Transit Mobility, Jobs Access and Low-income Labour Participation in US Metropolitan Areas," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 41(7), pages 1313-1331, June.
    6. Justin Tyndall, 2017. "Waiting for the R train: Public transportation and employment," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 54(2), pages 520-537, February.
    7. Emre Korsu & Sandrine Wenglenski, 2010. "Job Accessibility, Residential Segregation and Risk of Long-term Unemployment in the Paris Region," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(11), pages 2279-2324, October.
    8. Mizuki Kawabata, 2003. "Job access and employment among low-skilled autoless workers in US metropolitan areas," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(9), pages 1651-1668, September.
    9. Patacchini, Eleonora & Zenou, Yves, 2005. "Spatial mismatch, transport mode and search decisions in England," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 62-90, July.
    10. Ong, Paul M. & Houston, Douglas, 2002. "Transit, Employment and Women on Welfare," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3287s046, University of California Transportation Center.
    11. Edward A. Fieldhouse, 1999. "Ethnic Minority Unemployment and Spatial Mismatch: The Case of London," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 36(9), pages 1569-1596, August.
    12. Keith R. Ihlanfeldt & David L. Sjoquist, 1991. "The Effect of Job Access on Black and White Youth Employment: A Cross-sectional Analysis," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 28(2), pages 255-265, April.
    13. Harry J. Holzer & John M. Quigley & Steven Raphael, 2003. "Public transit and the spatial distribution of minority employment: Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 415-441.
    14. Donald Houston, 2005. "Employability, Skills Mismatch and Spatial Mismatch in Metropolitan Labour Markets," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 42(2), pages 221-243, February.
    15. Brian D. Taylor & Paul M. Ong, 1995. "Spatial Mismatch or Automobile Mismatch? An Examination of Race, Residence and Commuting in US Metropolitan Areas," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 32(9), pages 1453-1473, November.
    16. R.W. McQuaid, 2001. "Unemployed Job Seeker Attitudes towards Potential Travel-to-Work Times," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 355-368.
    17. John F. Kain, 1968. "Housing Segregation, Negro Employment, and Metropolitan Decentralization," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(2), pages 175-197.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:11:p:3958-:d:179366 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:trapol:v:66:y:2018:i:c:p:116-126 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:60:y:2017:i:c:p:1-9. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/30473/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.