IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jotrge/v18y2010i1p42-54.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Job accessibility and the modal mismatch in Detroit

Author

Listed:
  • Grengs, Joe

Abstract

Transportation scholars are challenging traditional formulations of the spatial mismatch hypothesis because previous studies have disregarded the considerable difference between travel modes. This case study of the Detroit metropolitan region uses 2000 census data and a gravity-based model of transportation accessibility to test differences in access to jobs among places and people, and provides support for recent calls for reconceptualizing spatial mismatch. It shows that even though Detroit experiences the greatest distance between African Americans and jobs of any region in the country, most central city neighborhoods offer an advantage in accessibility to jobs compared to most other places in the metropolitan region – as long as a resident has a car. Policies aimed at helping carless people gain access to automobiles may be an effective means of improving the employment outcomes of inner-city residents.

Suggested Citation

  • Grengs, Joe, 2010. "Job accessibility and the modal mismatch in Detroit," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 42-54.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jotrge:v:18:y:2010:i:1:p:42-54
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2009.01.012
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0966692309000131
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2009.01.012?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Valerie Preston & Sara McLafferty, 1999. "articles: Spatial mismatch research in the 1990s: progress and potential," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 78(4), pages 387-402.
    2. Steven Raphael & Michael A. Stoll, 2000. "Can Boosting Minority Car-Ownership Rates Narrow Inter-Racial Employment Gaps," JCPR Working Papers 200, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    3. Thomas W. Sanchez & Qing Shen & Zhong-Ren Peng, 2004. "Transit Mobility, Jobs Access and Low-income Labour Participation in US Metropolitan Areas," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 41(7), pages 1313-1331, June.
    4. Katherine M. O'Regan & John M. Quigley, 1996. "Spatial effects upon employment outcomes: the case of New Jersey teenagers," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue May, pages 41-64.
    5. R Cervero & T Rood & B Appleyard, 1999. "Tracking Accessibility: Employment and Housing Opportunities in the San Francisco Bay Area," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 31(7), pages 1259-1278, July.
    6. Mizuki Kawabata, 2003. "Job Access and Employment among Low-Skilled Autoless Workers in US Metropolitan Areas," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 35(9), pages 1651-1668, September.
    7. Gregory D. Squires & Charis E. Kubrin, 2005. "Privileged Places: Race, Uneven Development and the Geography of Opportunity in Urban America," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 42(1), pages 47-68, January.
    8. Evelyn Blumenberg & Paul Ong, 1998. "Job accessibility and welfare usage: Evidence from Los Angeles," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(4), pages 639-657.
    9. Wachs, Martin & Kumagai, T. Gordon, 1973. "Physical accessibility as a social indicator," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 7(5), pages 437-456, October.
    10. Marilyn Lucas & Charles Nicholson, 2003. "Subsidized vehicle acquisition and earned income in the transition from welfare to work," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 483-501, November.
    11. Mark W Horner & Jessica N Mefford, 2007. "Investigating Urban Spatial Mismatch Using Job–Housing Indicators to Model Home–Work Separation," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 39(6), pages 1420-1440, June.
    12. A G Wilson, 1971. "A Family of Spatial Interaction Models, and Associated Developments," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 3(1), pages 1-32, March.
    13. Daniel Baldwin Hess, 2005. "Access to Employment for Adults in Poverty in the Buffalo-Niagara Region," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 42(7), pages 1177-1200, June.
    14. Brian D. Taylor & Paul M. Ong, 1995. "Spatial Mismatch or Automobile Mismatch? An Examination of Race, Residence and Commuting in US Metropolitan Areas," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 32(9), pages 1453-1473, November.
    15. Mizuki Kawabata & Qing Shen, 2007. "Commuting Inequality between Cars and Public Transit: The Case of the San Francisco Bay Area, 1990-2000," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 44(9), pages 1759-1780, August.
    16. Evelyn Blumenberg, 2002. "On the Way to Work: Welfare Participants and Barriers to Employment," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 16(4), pages 314-325, November.
    17. John F. Kain, 1968. "Housing Segregation, Negro Employment, and Metropolitan Decentralization," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(2), pages 175-197.
    18. Harry J. Holzer, 1991. "The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis: What Has the Evidence Shown?," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 28(1), pages 105-122, February.
    19. S L Handy & D A Niemeier, 1997. "Measuring Accessibility: An Exploration of Issues and Alternatives," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 29(7), pages 1175-1194, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Merlin, Louis A. & Hu, Lingqian, 2017. "Does competition matter in measures of job accessibility? Explaining employment in Los Angeles," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 77-88.
    2. Sylvie Fol & Gabriel Dupuy & Olivier Coutard, 2007. "Transport Policy and the Car Divide in the UK, the US and France: Beyond the Environmental Debate," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(4), pages 802-818, December.
    3. Boarnet, Marlon G. & Giuliano, Genevieve & Hou, Yuting & Shin, Eun Jin, 2017. "First/last mile transit access as an equity planning issue," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 296-310.
    4. Golub, Aaron & Martens, Karel, 2014. "Using principles of justice to assess the modal equity of regional transportation plans," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 10-20.
    5. Xueming (Jimmy) Chen, 2018. "Review of the Transit Accessibility Concept: A Case Study of Richmond, Virginia," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(12), pages 1-19, December.
    6. Allen, Jeff & Farber, Steven, 2019. "A measure of competitive access to destinations for comparing across multiple study regions," SocArXiv 8yf7q, Center for Open Science.
    7. Lingqian Hu, 2017. "Job accessibility and employment outcomes: which income groups benefit the most?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(6), pages 1421-1443, November.
    8. Michael A. Stoll & Harry J. Holzer & Keith R. Ihlanfeldt, 2000. "Within cities and suburbs: Racial residential concentration and the spatial distribution of employment opportunities across sub-metropolitan areas," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 207-231.
    9. Gurley, Tami & Bruce, Donald, 2005. "The effects of car access on employment outcomes for welfare recipients," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 250-272, September.
    10. Moniruzzaman, Md & Páez, Antonio, 2012. "Accessibility to transit, by transit, and mode share: application of a logistic model with spatial filters," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 198-205.
    11. Ong, Paul M. & Miller, Douglas, 2003. "Spatial and Transportation Mismatch in Los Angeles," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2664v2n7, University of California Transportation Center.
    12. Hu, Lingqian & Schneider, Robert J., 2017. "Different ways to get to the same workplace: How does workplace location relate to commuting by different income groups?," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 106-115.
    13. Johnson, Daniel & Ercolani, Marco & Mackie, Peter, 2017. "Econometric analysis of the link between public transport accessibility and employment," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 1-9.
    14. Ong, Paul & Miller, Douglas, 2003. "Spatial and Transportation Mismatch in Los Angeles," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1m84h1b7, University of California Transportation Center.
    15. Foth, Nicole & Manaugh, Kevin & El-Geneidy, Ahmed M., 2013. "Towards equitable transit: examining transit accessibility and social need in Toronto, Canada, 1996–2006," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-10.
    16. Cheng, Jianquan & Bertolini, Luca, 2013. "Measuring urban job accessibility with distance decay, competition and diversity," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 100-109.
    17. Lowe, Kate & Mosby, Kim, 2016. "The conceptual mismatch: A qualitative analysis of transportation costs and stressors for low-income adults," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 1-8.
    18. Cui, Boer & Boisjoly, Geneviève & El-Geneidy, Ahmed & Levinson, David, 2019. "Accessibility and the journey to work through the lens of equity," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 269-277.
    19. Jen-Jia Lin & Chi-Hau Chen & Tsung-Yu Hsieh, 2016. "Job accessibility and ethnic minority employment in urban and rural areas in Taiwan," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(2), pages 363-382, June.
    20. Karner, Alex & Niemeier, Deb, 2013. "Civil rights guidance and equity analysis methods for regional transportation plans: a critical review of literature and practice," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 126-134.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jotrge:v:18:y:2010:i:1:p:42-54. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-transport-geography .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-transport-geography .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.