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Knowledge externalities and sectoral interdependences: Evidence from an open economy perspective

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  • Gehringer, Agnieszka

Abstract

The paper studies how producers and users benefit from reciprocal innovative activities. Ideally, such gains translate in an increased innovative dynamics of knowledge receivers, who accrue pecuniary knowledge externalities and take advantage of these external effects in their own activity. In principle, nothing prevents that, in an increasingly integrated world, knowledge externalities would be generated both in purely domestic as well as cross-country knowledge-based transactions. Nevertheless, the evidence reported in the paper suggests that localized rather than international knowledge externalities are dominating. In the empirical analysis based on a panel of 23 2-digit manufacturing and service sectors in 15 EU countries (1995–2007), dynamic panel techniques permitting to account for the possible reverse causality in the underlying relations are implemented.

Suggested Citation

  • Gehringer, Agnieszka, 2016. "Knowledge externalities and sectoral interdependences: Evidence from an open economy perspective," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 240-249.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:102:y:2016:i:c:p:240-249
    DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2015.09.011
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    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Ping-Chuan & Hung, Shiu-Wan, 2016. "An actor-network perspective on evaluating the R&D linking efficiency of innovation ecosystems," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 303-312.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Knowledge externalities; Sector-level data; International knowledge spillovers; Productivity; Manufacturing; Services;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation

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