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The poverty-HIV/AIDS nexus in Africa: A livelihood approach

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  • Masanjala, Winford

Abstract

This paper reviews the nexus between poverty and HIV/AIDS in Africa using a sustainable livelihood framework. Much of the literature on HIV and AIDS has generated an almost universal consensus that the AIDS epidemic is having an immense impact on the economies of hard-hit countries, hurting not only individuals, families and firms, but also significantly slowing economic growth and worsening poverty. International evidence has concentrated on the pathways through which HIV/AIDS undermines livelihoods and raises vulnerability to future collapse of livelihoods. Yet, little attention has been paid to the role that social relations and livelihood strategies can play in bringing about risky social interaction that raises the chance of contracting HIV. Using the sustainable livelihood and social relation approaches, this article demonstrates that although AIDS is not simply a disease of the poor, determinants of the epidemic go far beyond individual volition and that some dimensions of being poor increase risk and vulnerability to HIV.

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  • Masanjala, Winford, 2007. "The poverty-HIV/AIDS nexus in Africa: A livelihood approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(5), pages 1032-1041, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:64:y:2007:i:5:p:1032-1041
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chris Desmond & Janet Seeley & Candice Groenewald & Nothando Ngwenya & Kate Rich & Tony Barnett, 2019. "Interpreting social determinants: Emergent properties and adolescent risk behaviour," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(12), pages 1-17, December.
    2. Sarah Baird & Aislinn Bohren & Craig McIntosh & Berk Ozler, 2014. "Designing Experiments to Measure Spillover Effects," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-032, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    3. Fabrice Murtin & Federica Marzo, 2007. "HIV/AIDS and Poverty in South Africa: a Bayesian Estimation," Cahiers de recherche 07-08, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
    4. Messina, Jane P. & Emch, Michael & Muwonga, Jeremie & Mwandagalirwa, Kashamuka & Edidi, Samuel B. & Mama, Nicaise & Okenge, Augustin & Meshnick, Steven R., 2010. "Spatial and socio-behavioral patterns of HIV prevalence in the Democratic Republic of Congo," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(8), pages 1428-1435, October.
    5. Tsai, Alexander C. & Bangsberg, David R. & Emenyonu, Nneka & Senkungu, Jude K. & Martin, Jeffrey N. & Weiser, Sheri D., 2011. "The social context of food insecurity among persons living with HIV/AIDS in rural Uganda," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(12), pages 1717-1724.
    6. Lori Hunter & John Reid-Hresko & Thomas Dickinson, 2011. "Environmental Change, Risky Sexual Behavior, and the HIV/AIDS Pandemic: Linkages Through Livelihoods in Rural Haiti," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(5), pages 729-750, October.
    7. Sarah Baird & Aislinn Bohren & Craig McIntosh & Berk Ozler, 2015. "Designing Experiments to Measure Spillover Effects, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 15-021, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 01 Jun 2015.
    8. Jing Liu & Fubin Huang & Zihan Wang & Chuanmin Shuai & Jiaxin Li, 2020. "Understanding the Role of Rural Poor’s Endogenous Impetus in Poverty Reduction: Evidence from China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(6), pages 1-16, March.
    9. Steinert, Janina Isabel & Cluver, Lucie Dale & Meinck, Franziska & Doubt, Jenny & Vollmer, Sebastian, 2018. "Household economic strengthening through financial and psychosocial programming: Evidence from a field experiment in South Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 443-466.
    10. Beth S Rachlis & Edward J Mills & Donald C Cole, 2011. "Livelihood Security and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Low and Middle Income Settings: A Systematic Review," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 6(5), pages 1-15, May.
    11. King, Brian & Winchester, Margaret S., 2018. "HIV as social and ecological experience," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 208(C), pages 64-71.
    12. Adekambi, Souleimane Adeyemi & Ingenbleek, Paul T.M. & Trijp, Hans C.M. van, 2013. "Integrating subsistence producers from developing and emerging countries with the world market: the roles of Reactive and Proactive market orientation," 2013 Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161648, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).

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