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Exchange rate pass-through in deflation: The case of Taiwan

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  • Lin, Po-Chun
  • Wu, Chung-Shu

Abstract

This paper incorporates deflation in an analysis of the relationship between the exchange rate pass-through and inflation. Using a nonlinear model based on monthly data of Taiwan's import prices from 1981 to 2008, we find that the degree of exchange rate pass-through is increasing in deflation. The increase becomes smaller when the price of oil is excluded. Evidence for pass-through increasing in deflation has not previously been found in the existing literature and presents a new understanding of the pricing behavior of firms. Poor profits in deflation cause firms to pass through most of the cost of exchange rate changes to their products to avoid exiting the market.

Suggested Citation

  • Lin, Po-Chun & Wu, Chung-Shu, 2012. "Exchange rate pass-through in deflation: The case of Taiwan," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 101-111.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:reveco:v:22:y:2012:i:1:p:101-111
    DOI: 10.1016/j.iref.2011.10.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nidhaleddine Ben Cheikh & Christophe Rault, 2017. "Investigating first-stage exchange rate pass-through: Sectoral and macro evidence from euro area countries," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(12), pages 2611-2638, December.
    2. Jiménez-Rodríguez, Rebeca & Morales-Zumaquero, Amalia, 2016. "A new look at exchange rate pass-through in the G-7 countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 985-1000.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exchange rate pass-through; Threshold autoregressive; Deflation;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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