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The impact of missed payments and foreclosures on credit scores

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  • Demyanyk, Yuliya

Abstract

This paper debunks the common perception that “foreclosure will ruin your credit score.” Using individual-level data from a credit bureau matched with loan-level mortgage data, it is estimated that the very first missed mortgage payment leads to the biggest reduction in credit scores. The effects of subsequent loan impairments are increasingly muted. Post-delinquency foreclosures have only a minimal effect on credit scores. Moreover, credit scores improve substantially a year after borrowers experience 90-day delinquency or foreclosure. The data supports one possible explanation of this improvement: the absence of mortgage payments relaxes the borrowers’ budget constraint, allowing them to restore other forms of credit.

Suggested Citation

  • Demyanyk, Yuliya, 2017. "The impact of missed payments and foreclosures on credit scores," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 108-119.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:108-119
    DOI: 10.1016/j.qref.2016.07.014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Demyanyk, Yuliya & Luengo-Prado, Maria Jose & Hryshko, Dmytro & Sorensen, Bent E., 2015. "The Rise and Fall of Consumption in the 2000s," Working Paper 1507, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Credit score; Foreclosure; Delinquency; Crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • R20 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - General

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