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Interest groups and the electoral control of politicians

  • Snyder Jr., James M.
  • Ting, Michael M.

We develop a model of interest group influence in the presence of repeated electoral competition. In each period of the game, an interest group attempts to "buy" an incumbent's policy choice, and a voter chooses whether to replace the incumbent with an unknown challenger. The voter faces a tension between retaining good politician types and rewarding past performance. The model predicts that "above average" incumbents face little discipline, but others are disciplined increasingly - and re-elected at a higher rate - as the interest group becomes more extreme. Extensions of the model consider term limits, long-lived groups, and multiple groups.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Public Economics.

Volume (Year): 92 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3-4 (April)
Pages: 482-500

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Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:92:y:2008:i:3-4:p:482-500
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505578

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