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Spending cuts or tax increases? The composition of fiscal adjustments as a signal

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  • Konishi, Hideki

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  • Konishi, Hideki, 2006. "Spending cuts or tax increases? The composition of fiscal adjustments as a signal," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(6), pages 1441-1469, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:50:y:2006:i:6:p:1441-1469
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    Cited by:

    1. Graham Mallard, 2014. "Static Common Agency And Political Influence: An Evaluative Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 17-35, February.
    2. Shun-ichiro Bessho & Haruaki Hirota, 2021. "Do Public Account Financial Statements Matter? Evidence from Japanese Municipalities," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1172, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    3. Miyazaki, Tomomi, 2014. "Fiscal reform and fiscal sustainability: Evidence from Australia and Sweden," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 141-151.
    4. Shun-ichiro Bessho & Kimiko Terai, 2013. "Fiscal restraints by advisors," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 205-232, August.

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