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Working while enrolled in a university: does it pay?

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  • Hakkinen, Iida

Abstract

Working while studying at university increases the time-to-degree and may interfere with learning, but the acquired work experience may also improve employment opportunities and increase wages after the graduation. This study examines how university students' employment decisions affect their labor market success after the graduation. The study is based on an individual panel data set of Finnish university students. The data set covers the years 1987-1998, which was a period of significant changes in the Finnish labor market. The study finds that in-school work experience increases graduates' earnings at the beginning of the career, but there are no statistically significant persistent effects on employment or earnings after controlling for the selection bias in work experience acquisition.
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Suggested Citation

  • Hakkinen, Iida, 2006. "Working while enrolled in a university: does it pay?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 167-189, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:13:y:2006:i:2:p:167-189
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    Cited by:

    1. Suhonen, Tuomo, 2013. "Are there returns from university location in a state-funded university system?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, pages 465-478.
    2. Regula Geel & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2010. "Earning While Learning: Labor Market Returns to Student Employment During Tertiary Education," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0049, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    3. Giorgia Casalone & Carmen Aina, 2011. "Does time-to-degree matter? The effect of delayed graduation on employment and wages," Working Papers 38, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.
    4. Beblavý, Miroslav & Teteryatnikova, Mariya & Thum, Anna-Elisabeth, 2015. "Does the growth in higher education mean a decline in the quality of degrees?," CEPS Papers 10258, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    5. Andini, Corrado & Pereira, Pedro T., 2007. "Full-time Schooling, Part-time Schooling, and Wages: Returns and Risks in Portugal," IZA Discussion Papers 2651, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00144366 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Thomas Aronsson & Tomas Sjögren & Torbjörn Dalin, 2009. "Optimal taxation and redistribution in an OLG model with unemployment," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, pages 198-218.
    8. Blomquist, Sören & Christiansen, Vidar, 2004. "Taxation and Heterogeneous Preferences," Working Paper Series 2004:9, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    9. Thomas Aronsson & Sören Blomquist, 2008. "Redistribution and Provision of Public Goods in an Economic Federation," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 10(1), pages 125-143, February.
    10. Alam, Moudud & Carling, Kenneth & Nääs, Ola, 2013. "The effect of summer jobs on post-schooling incomes," Working Paper Series 2013:24, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    11. Nordström Skans, Oskar, 2004. "Scarring effects of the first labour market experience: A sibling based analysis," Working Paper Series 2004:14, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    12. Sören Blomquist & Vidar Christiansen, 2008. "Taxation and Heterogeneous Preferences," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, pages 218-244.
    13. Pauline Domingo, 2007. "Travail en cours d'études, échec et insertion professionnelle : le cas des DEUG non diplômés," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne r07007, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    14. Sören Blomquist & Vidar Christiansen, 2008. "Taxation and Heterogeneous Preferences," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, pages 218-244.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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