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Alcohol availability and crime: Lessons from liberalized weekend sales restrictions

  • Grönqvist, Hans
  • Niknami, Susan
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    We investigate a large-scale experimental scheme implemented in Sweden whereby the state in the year 2000 required all alcohol retail stores in selected areas to stay open on Saturdays. The purpose of the scheme was to evaluate possible social consequences of expanding access to alcohol during weekends. Using rich individual level data we show that this increase in alcohol availability raised both alcohol use and crime.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Urban Economics.

    Volume (Year): 81 (2014)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 77-84

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:81:y:2014:i:c:p:77-84
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