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Urban effects on participation and wages: Are there gender differences?

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  • Phimister, Euan

Abstract

This paper estimates participation and wage equations using panel data from the United Kingdom to explore differences in urban and rural wages and participation by gender. The results suggest a small but economically significant participation premium for urban women relative to rural female workers. Results from the wage estimations suggest that after controlling for sample selectivity, observed and unobserved heterogeneity, the wage premium received by urban women is larger than that obtained by men. Consistent with the hypothesis that poorer matching in less dense labour markets affects rural workers, there is also evidence of higher rural wage depreciation for both men and women, while returns to experience for rural men are also lower than for urban workers.
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  • Phimister, Euan, 2005. "Urban effects on participation and wages: Are there gender differences?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 513-536, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:58:y:2005:i:3:p:513-536
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    Cited by:

    1. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Gobillon, Laurent, 2015. "The Empirics of Agglomeration Economies," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    2. Boris Hirsch & Marion König & Joachim Möller, 2013. "Is There a Gap in the Gap? Regional Differences in the Gender Pay Gap," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 60(4), pages 412-439, September.
    3. Kim, Dongsoo & Liu, Feng & Yezer, Anthony, 2009. "Do inter-city differences in intra-city wage differentials have any interesting implications?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 203-209, November.
    4. Konstantinos Pouliakas & Deborah Roberts & Eudokia Balamou & Dimitris Psaltopoulos, 2014. "Modelling the Effects of Immigration on Regional Economic Performance and Wage Distribution: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Analysis of Three European Union Regions," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 318-338, February.
    5. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1461-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral Del Rio, "undated". "The Geographical Concentration of Unemployment: a Male-female Comparison in Spain," Regional and Urban Modeling 283600002, EcoMod.
    7. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Roberts, Deborah & Balamou, Eudokia & Psaltopoulos, Dimitris, 2008. "Modelling the Effects of Immigration on Regional Economic Performance and the Wage Distribution: A CGE Analysis of Three EU Regions," MPRA Paper 14157, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Mikaela Backman, 2014. "Returns to Education across the Urban-Rural Hierarchy," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 44(1), pages 33-59, Spring.
    9. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Sylvie Démurger & Shi Li, 2016. "Productivity gains from agglomeration and migration in Chinese cities over 2002-2013," Post-Print halshs-01420835, HAL.

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