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Factors shaping Americans’ objective well-being: A systems science approach with network analysis

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  • Cifuentes, Myriam Patricia
  • Doogan, Nathan J.
  • Fernandez, Soledad A.
  • Seiber, Eric E.

Abstract

Despite the introduction of multiple factors, multidimensional approaches cannot represent the complexity of the objective determinants of well-being (ODW). This paper proposes an alternative OWD model that adds a systemic approach, by using Bayesian networks algorithms to discover a directed two level network of variables nested in subnetworks of determinants. The network was inferred by using subsamples of the 2013 version of the American Community Survey. Network analysis methods applied to the model provided new insights concerning single ODW relevance and the roles that are useful to focus selective welfare interventions; they also offered a big picture that is fundamental to reason about the unpremeditated universal character of the selective US welfare policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Cifuentes, Myriam Patricia & Doogan, Nathan J. & Fernandez, Soledad A. & Seiber, Eric E., 2016. "Factors shaping Americans’ objective well-being: A systems science approach with network analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1018-1039.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:38:y:2016:i:6:p:1018-1039
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpolmod.2016.03.008
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    1. repec:bla:srbeha:v:34:y:2017:i:3:p:277-288 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Well-being; Objective determinants of well-being; Bayesian networks; Network analysis; Complex systems;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • C39 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Other

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