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Identities, conflicting behavioural norms and the importance of job attributes

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  • Russo, Giovanni
  • Hooft, Edwin van

Abstract

The paper empirically expounds the richness of the identity approach to labour-market behaviour by allowing individuals to experience identity conflict. Specifically, it investigates the relationship between the importance individuals attach to labour-market activities - which is influenced by the identity to which they adhere - and their preferences for job attributes. The analysis shows that individuals who consider labour-market success as instrumental for achieving their life goals tend to attach importance to job characteristics such as pay level and career and training opportunities. Individuals for whom non-labour-market activities are important and in conflict with labour-market activities are found to attach importance to the possibility of working on a convenient time schedule. Moreover, consistently with the identity approach to labour-market behaviour, men appear to resolve the conflict between career and non-work activities in favor of the former. Finally, unobserved factors that increase the desire to work part-time have a negative impact on the likelihood of attaching importance to the training and career opportunities offered by the job.

Suggested Citation

  • Russo, Giovanni & Hooft, Edwin van, 2011. "Identities, conflicting behavioural norms and the importance of job attributes," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 103-119, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:32:y:2011:i:1:p:103-119
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Heather Brown & Jennifer Roberts, 2014. "Gender Role Identity, Breadwinner Status and Psychological Well-being in the Household," Working Papers 2014004, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    2. Constant, Amelie F., 2014. "Ethnic Identity and Work," IZA Discussion Papers 8571, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Cédric Gorinas, 2014. "Ethnic identity, majority norms, and the native–immigrant employment gap," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 225-250, January.

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