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The university workers’ willingness to pay for commuting


  • Giovanni Russo


  • Jos Ommeren


  • Piet Rietveld


Using a dynamic approach, employing data on job mobility, we demonstrate that university workers’ marginal willingness to pay for reducing commuting distance is about €0.25 per kilometre travelled. This corresponds to a marginal willingness to pay for reducing commuting time of about 75 % of the net average hourly wage. For females, the willingness to pay is substantially higher than for males. It is also substantially higher for workers that work few hours per day, as predicted by theory. Copyright The Author(s) 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Russo & Jos Ommeren & Piet Rietveld, 2012. "The university workers’ willingness to pay for commuting," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(6), pages 1121-1132, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:39:y:2012:i:6:p:1121-1132 DOI: 10.1007/s11116-012-9414-9

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jos Van Ommeren & Mihails Hazans, 2005. "The Workers' Value of the Remaining Employment Contract Duration," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-069/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Gruetter, Max & Lalive, Rafael, 2009. "The importance of firms in wage determination," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 149-160, April.
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    4. Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau, Eva & van Ommeren, Jos N., 2010. "Labour supply and commuting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 82-89, July.
    5. Eva Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau & Jos N. Van Ommeren, 2012. "Start Time and Worker Compensation Implications for Staggered-Hours Programmes," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 46(2), pages 205-220, May.
    6. Jos van Ommeren & Gerard J. van den Berg & Cees Gorter, 2000. "Estimating the Marginal Willingness to Pay for Commuting," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(3), pages 541-563.
    7. Arnott, Richard, 2007. "Congestion tolling with agglomeration externalities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 187-203, September.
    8. Ransom, Michael R, 1993. "Seniority and Monopsony in the Academic Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 221-233, March.
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    10. Zax, Jeffrey S., 1991. "Compensation for commutes in labor and housing markets," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 192-207, September.
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    12. Van Ommeren, Jos & Fosgerau, Mogens, 2009. "Workers' marginal costs of commuting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 38-47, January.
    13. Harald Dale-Olsen, 2006. "Estimating Workers' Marginal Willingness to Pay for Safety using Linked Employer-Employee Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(289), pages 99-127, February.
    14. Eva Gutiérrez‐i‐Puigarnau & Jos N. Van Ommeren, 2011. "Welfare Effects Of Distortionary Fringe Benefits Taxation: The Case Of Employer‐Provided Cars," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1105-1122, November.
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    16. Hwang, Hae-shin & Mortensen, Dale T & Reed, W Robert, 1998. "Hedonic Wages and Labor Market Search," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(4), pages 815-847, October.
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    18. Barbezat, Debra A., 2004. "Revisiting the seniority wage effect for faculty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 289-294, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stockton, Isabel & Bergemann, Annette & Brunow, Stephan, 2016. "There And Back Again: Women's Marginal Commuting Costs," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145919, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item


    University; Workers; Commute; Willingness to pay;

    JEL classification:

    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand


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