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The university workers’ willingness to pay for commuting

  • Giovanni Russo

    ()

  • Jos Ommeren

    ()

  • Piet Rietveld

Using a dynamic approach, employing data on job mobility, we demonstrate that university workers’ marginal willingness to pay for reducing commuting distance is about €0.25 per kilometre travelled. This corresponds to a marginal willingness to pay for reducing commuting time of about 75 % of the net average hourly wage. For females, the willingness to pay is substantially higher than for males. It is also substantially higher for workers that work few hours per day, as predicted by theory. Copyright The Author(s) 2012

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11116-012-9414-9
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Transportation.

Volume (Year): 39 (2012)
Issue (Month): 6 (November)
Pages: 1121-1132

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Handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:39:y:2012:i:6:p:1121-1132
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  1. Ernesto Villanueva, 2007. "Estimating Compensating Wage Differentials Using Voluntary Job Changes: Evidence from Germany," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(4), pages 544-561, July.
  2. Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau, Eva & van Ommeren, Jos N., 2010. "Labour supply and commuting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 82-89, July.
  3. Parry, Ian W.H. & Bento, Antonio Miguel R., 1999. "Revenue recycling and the welfare effects of road pricing," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2253, The World Bank.
  4. van Ommeren, Jos & Fosgerau, Mogens, 2008. "Workers' marginal costs of commuting," MPRA Paper 12010, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Richard Arnott, 2007. "Congestion Tolling with Agglomeration Externalities," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 660, Boston College Department of Economics.
  6. Eva Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau & Jos N. van Ommeren, 2010. "Start Time and Worker Compensation: Implications for Staggered-Hours Programs," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 310, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  7. Ransom, Michael R, 1993. "Seniority and Monopsony in the Academic Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 221-33, March.
  8. Hwang, Hae-shin & Mortensen, Dale T & Reed, W Robert, 1998. "Hedonic Wages and Labor Market Search," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(4), pages 815-47, October.
  9. Max Gruetter & Rafael Lalive, . "The Importance of Firms in Wage Determination," IEW - Working Papers 207, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  10. Harald Dale-Olsen, 2006. "Estimating Workers' Marginal Willingness to Pay for Safety using Linked Employer-Employee Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(289), pages 99-127, 02.
  11. Zax, Jeffrey S., 1991. "Compensation for commutes in labor and housing markets," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 192-207, September.
  12. Hwang, Hae-shin & Reed, W Robert & Hubbard, Carlton, 1992. "Compensating Wage Differentials and Unobserved Productivity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 835-58, August.
  13. Ommeren, Jos van & Berg, Gerard J. van den & Gorter, Cees, 1998. "Estimating the marginal willingness to pay for commuting," Serie Research Memoranda 0046, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  14. Eva Gutiérrez‐i‐Puigarnau & Jos N. Van Ommeren, 2011. "Welfare Effects Of Distortionary Fringe Benefits Taxation: The Case Of Employer‐Provided Cars," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1105-1122, November.
  15. Jos Van Ommeren & Mihails Hazans, 2005. "The workers' value of the remaining employment contract duration," Labor and Demography 0506006, EconWPA.
  16. De Borger, Bruno & Fosgerau, Mogens, 2008. "The trade-off between money and travel time: A test of the theory of reference-dependent preferences," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 101-115, July.
  17. Barbezat, Debra A., 2004. "Revisiting the seniority wage effect for faculty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 289-294, February.
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