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Estimating employment dynamics across occupations and sectors of industry

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  • Cörvers, Frank
  • Dupuy, Arnaud

Abstract

In this paper, we estimate the demand for workers by sector and occupation using system dynamic OLS techniques to account for the employment dynamics dependence across occupations and sectors of industry. The short run dynamics are decomposed into intra and intersectoral dynamics. We find that employment by occupation and sector is significantly affected by the short run intersectoral dynamics, using Dutch data for the period 1988-2003. On average, these intersectoral dynamics account for 20% of the predicted occupational employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Cörvers, Frank & Dupuy, Arnaud, 2010. "Estimating employment dynamics across occupations and sectors of industry," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 17-27, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:17-27
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    Cited by:

    1. Jens Horbach & Markus Janser, 2016. "The role of innovation and agglomeration for employment growth in the environmental sector," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(6), pages 488-511, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour demand Occupational structure Intra and Intersectoral dynamics System dynamic OLS;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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