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International trade and finance: Complementaries in the United Kingdom 1870-1913 and the United States 1920-1930

  • Taylor, Alan M.
  • Wilson, Janine L.F.

Do international trade and finance flow together? In a variety of theoretical models, trade and finance can be shown to have the potential to be substitutes or complements, so the matter must be resolved empirically. We study trade and financial flows from the United Kingdom from 1870 to 1913 and the United States in the interwar years. These were the two major capital exporters and key financial centers in each era. We find that trade and finance were robustly correlated for each case. We consider simultaneity issues. We also discuss evidence from the British Empire which casts doubt on the idea that trade is a punishment device in the event of a default.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of International Money and Finance.

Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 268-288

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:30:y:2011:i:1:p:268-288
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30443

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