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Aging and house prices

  • Takáts, Előd

The paper investigates how aging will affect house prices. It uses for the first time a house price dataset covering 22 advanced economies. The analysis finds that demography did and will affect real house prices significantly. The results suggest that a major shift is taking place. In the past 40years, on average demography increased advanced economy real house prices by around 30 basis points per annum, while in the next 40years aging will decrease them on average by around 80 basis points per annum compared to neutral demographics. The shift from demographic tailwinds to headwinds might also be relevant when thinking about financial asset prices.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Housing Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 131-141

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:21:y:2012:i:2:p:131-141
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